Who is more proactive, the optimist or the pessimist? Exploring the role of hope as a moderator

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research tested the existence of a moderation role of hope on the effects of optimism and pessimism over proactive coping in a sample survey of 343 subjects. The results showed that optimism explained proactive coping, independent of hope. However, hope appeared to moderate the relationship between pessimism and passive coping, a criterion variable that emerged from the psychometric analysis of the proactive coping measure. Specifically, for individuals low in pessimism, being high or low in hope did not impact coping, but for individuals high in pessimism, having higher levels of hope reduced passive coping. A deeper analysis also indicated that this was particularly due to the moderating role of the pathways dimension of hope. We discuss these results in light of different adaptive strategies of optimists and pessimists and draw implications for psychological research and practice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)100-109
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Positive Psychology
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2008

Keywords

  • Hope
  • Moderation effect
  • Optimism
  • Passive coping
  • Pessimism
  • Proactive coping

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Who is more proactive, the optimist or the pessimist? Exploring the role of hope as a moderator'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this