VoiceToModel: an approach to generate requirements models from speech recognition mechanisms

Fábio Soares, João Araújo, Fernando Wanderley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Requirements are typically modelled using some graphical notation with the aid of CASE tools. However, these tools make this activity exclusive to requirements engineers and stakeholders with no accessibility problems, but disabled professionals often have accessibility problems to use tools to build requirements models. Also, accessibility problems can happen to stakeholders in general in a particular context where the use of voice is more convenient (e.g., in a public transport). In this paper, the VoiceToModel framework is proposed to improve the accessibility of the requirements process by effectively integrating a requirements engineer or stakeholder with disabilities during requirements modelling. Through speech recognition, the engineer should be capable of voicing the requirements, which are automatically used to generate requirements models, more specifically goal-oriented models, object models and feature models. Also, the automated framework generates requirements models from speech recognition by firstly defining a grammar where we have the commands to create and modify a model. These commands return a feedback via voice. We show the applicability of the framework through an example and discuss the results of an experiment with 14 participants, including 2 blind people.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication30TH ANNUAL ACM SYMPOSIUM ON APPLIED COMPUTING, VOLS I AND II
Pages1350-1357
Number of pages8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015
Event30th Annual ACM Symposium on Applied Computing, SAC 2015 - Salamanca, Spain
Duration: 13 Apr 201517 Apr 2015

Conference

Conference30th Annual ACM Symposium on Applied Computing, SAC 2015
CountrySpain
CitySalamanca
Period13/04/1517/04/15

Fingerprint

Speech recognition
Engineers
Feedback
Experiments

Cite this

Soares, F., Araújo, J., & Wanderley, F. (2015). VoiceToModel: an approach to generate requirements models from speech recognition mechanisms. In 30TH ANNUAL ACM SYMPOSIUM ON APPLIED COMPUTING, VOLS I AND II (pp. 1350-1357) https://doi.org/10.1145/2695664.2695724
Soares, Fábio ; Araújo, João ; Wanderley, Fernando. / VoiceToModel: an approach to generate requirements models from speech recognition mechanisms. 30TH ANNUAL ACM SYMPOSIUM ON APPLIED COMPUTING, VOLS I AND II. 2015. pp. 1350-1357
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Soares, F, Araújo, J & Wanderley, F 2015, VoiceToModel: an approach to generate requirements models from speech recognition mechanisms. in 30TH ANNUAL ACM SYMPOSIUM ON APPLIED COMPUTING, VOLS I AND II. pp. 1350-1357, 30th Annual ACM Symposium on Applied Computing, SAC 2015, Salamanca, Spain, 13/04/15. https://doi.org/10.1145/2695664.2695724

VoiceToModel: an approach to generate requirements models from speech recognition mechanisms. / Soares, Fábio; Araújo, João; Wanderley, Fernando.

30TH ANNUAL ACM SYMPOSIUM ON APPLIED COMPUTING, VOLS I AND II. 2015. p. 1350-1357.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Soares F, Araújo J, Wanderley F. VoiceToModel: an approach to generate requirements models from speech recognition mechanisms. In 30TH ANNUAL ACM SYMPOSIUM ON APPLIED COMPUTING, VOLS I AND II. 2015. p. 1350-1357 https://doi.org/10.1145/2695664.2695724