Upper Arm Anthropometry Is Not a Valid Predictor of Regional Body Composition in Preterm Infants

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Abstract

Background: Upper arm anthropometry has been used in the nutritional assessment of small infants, but it has not yet been validated as a predictor of regional body composition in this population. Objective: Validation of measured and derived upper arm anthropometry as a predictor of arm fat and fat-free compartments in preterm infants. Methods: Upper arm anthropometry, including the upper arm cross-sectional areas, was compared individually or in combination with other anthropometric measurements, with the cross-sectional arm areas measured by magnetic resonance imaging, in a cohort of consecutive preterm appropriate-for-gestationalage neonates, just before discharge. Results: Thirty infants born with (mean +/- SD) a gestational-age of 30.7 +/- 1.9 weeks and birth weight of 1,380 +/- 325 g, were assessed at 35.4 +/- 1.1 weeks of corrected gestational age, weighing 1,785 +/- 93 g. None of the anthropometric measurements are reliable predictors (r(2) < 0.56) of the measurements obtained by magnetic resonance imaging, individually or in combination with other anthropometric measurements. Conclusion: Both measured anthropometry and derived upper arm anthropometry are inaccurate predictors of regional body composition in preterm appropriate-for-gestational-age infants. Copyright (C) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)74-79
Number of pages6
JournalNeonatology
Volume95
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2008

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Preterm infant
  • Upper arm anthropometry

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