Tumor Microenvironment – Selective Pressures Boosting Cancer Progression

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

In 2018, 9.6 million deaths from cancer were estimated, being this disease the second leading cause of death worldwide. Notwithstanding all the efforts developed in prevention, diagnosis and new treatment approaches, chemoresistance seems to be inevitable, leading to cancer progression, recurrence and affecting the outcome of the disease. As more and more evidence support that cancer is an evolutionary and ecological process, this concept is rarely applied in the clinical context. In fact, cancer cells emerge and progress within an ecological niche – the tumor microenvironment – that is shared with several other cell types and that is continuously changing. Therefore, the tumor microenvironment imposes several selective pressures on cancer cells such as acidosis, hypoxia, competition for space and resources, immune predation and anti-cancer therapies, that cancer cells must be able to adapt to or will face extinction. In here, the role of the tumor microenvironment selective pressures on cancer progression will be discussed, as well as the targeting of its features/components as strategies to fight cancer.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer
Pages35-49
Number of pages15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume1219
ISSN (Print)0065-2598
ISSN (Electronic)2214-8019

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • Evolution
  • Metabolic selection
  • Microenvironment

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  • Cite this

    Nunes, S. C. (2020). Tumor Microenvironment – Selective Pressures Boosting Cancer Progression. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (pp. 35-49). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1219). Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-34025-4_2