Triterpenoids and other potentially active compounds from wheat straw: Isolation, identification, and synthesis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Straw consists of the above-ground fractions (normally cut at a height of around 20 cm) of cereal plants after removal of the grain. 1 Depending on the harvesting system, part of the cut straw is left in the field together with the stubble. The straw length and diameter vary greatly and, consequently, also the biomass yield both within and between species. The biomass production and its chemical composition are important parameters since straw and other fibrous by-products from cereals that are available in the world amount to approximately 3 trillion tonnes per year. 2 Part of the straw is utilized for feed, 3 paper, 4 and fuel, 5 but a major part of the straw is discarded as a waste product. In some regions of the world straw is used in mulch-tillage in no-till cropping systems, 6,7 a common agricultural practice credited with a number of ecological advantages such as reduction of soil compaction, good erosion control, better water retention, and conservation of organic matter. In many instances, inhibitory effects on germination and growth of other plant species were observed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBiologically Active Natural Products: Agrochemicals
PublisherCRC Press
Pages69-81
Number of pages13
ISBN (Electronic)9781420048629
ISBN (Print)0849318858, 9780849318856
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1999

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Triterpenoids and other potentially active compounds from wheat straw: Isolation, identification, and synthesis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this