To the victors the spoils! Distributed agencies, inhumanities and the case of Comrade Duch of the Khmer Rouge

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Can men claim innocence of involvement in massive crimes due to their relative powerlessness to make events transpire otherwise? Should accountability be assigned to the very top level only? Do followers have not only material but also moral responsibilities as facilitators or supporters of bad or evil leadership (Kellerman, 2004)? No: we will argue that even lower-level participants are implicated in power relations and thus can be held responsible (Lukes, 1974). It is not that ‘lower level participants in organizations have power’, as Pfeffer (1992, p. 130) remarked. Clearly not, if we take the meaning of ‘have’ literally: power is not something that one can have, like a cough or a cold, so much as a relational condition. One is always in relations of power for they are inescapable. Power is a constitutive feature of social relations.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMateriality and space
Subtitle of host publicationOrganizations, artefacts and practices
EditorsFrancois-Xavier de Vaujany, Nathalie Mitev
Place of PublicationBasingstoke
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages216-239
ISBN (Electronic)9781137304100
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2013

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'To the victors the spoils! Distributed agencies, inhumanities and the case of Comrade Duch of the Khmer Rouge'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Clegg, S., Cunha, M. P. E., & Rego, A. (2013). To the victors the spoils! Distributed agencies, inhumanities and the case of Comrade Duch of the Khmer Rouge. In F-X. de Vaujany, & N. Mitev (Eds.), Materiality and space: Organizations, artefacts and practices (pp. 216-239). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137304094