The self-inflicted burns-Typology and its prognostic relevance in a 14-year review of self-inflicted burns in a tertiary referral centre

Paula Moniz, Diogo Casal, Carlos Mavioso, José Videira-Castro, Maria Angélica-Almeida

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Self-inflicted burns (SIB) are responsible for 2-6% of admissions to Burn Units in Europe and North America, and for as many as 25% of admissions in developing nations. Recently, a promising new tool was proposed to stratify SIB patients in the following subgroups: "typical", "delirious", and "reactive". However, as far as the authors know, the clinical usefulness of this instrument has not yet been validated by others. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical records of 56 patients admitted to our Burn Unit with the diagnosis of SIB injury in the past 14 years. The following parameters were evaluated: demographic features; psychiatric illness; substance abuse; mechanism of injury; burn depth, total body surface area (TBSA) involved, Abbreviated Burn Severity Index (ABSI); length of hospital stay, and mortality. All patients were followed up by a psychologist and a psychiatrist, and were classified according to the SIB-Typology Tool, into three classes: "typical", "delirious" and "reactive". There was a slight predominance of the "typical" type (44.6%), followed by the "delirious" type (30.4%), and, finally the "reactive" type (25.0%). Mortality was significantly higher in the "typical" subgroup. In conclusion, the SIB-Typology Tool appears to be a valuable instrument in the clinical management of SIB patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)322-327
Number of pages6
JournalBurns
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2011

Keywords

  • Psychiatric disorder
  • Self-inflicted burns
  • Self-injurious behavior
  • Suicide attempt

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