The relationship between abusive supervision, distributive justice and job satisfaction

a substitutes for leadership approach

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)
33 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Introduction: Recently, interest in abusive supervision has grown (Tepper, 2007). However, little is still known about organizational factors that can reduce the adverse effects of abusive supervision. Objective: Based on a substitute for leadership perspective (Kerr & Jermier, 1978), we predict that job resources adequacy and role clarity act as buffers in the negative relationship between abusive supervision, distributive justice and job satisfaction. Method: A sample of 253 employees from a City Hall was used to test our hypotheses. Results: We found that abusive supervision was significant and negatively related to distributive justice when job resources adequacy and role clarity were low, but not when job resources adequacy and role clarity were high, with consequences for job satisfaction. Conclusions: These findings suggest that job resources adequacy and role clarity can reduce the negative impact of abusive supervision, which then lessens distributive unfairness perceptions and job dissatisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)187-198
JournalRevue Europeenne de Psychologie Appliquee
Volume67
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

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Job Satisfaction
Social Justice
Buffers

Keywords

  • Abusive supervision
  • Distributive justice
  • Job resources adequacy
  • Job satisfaction
  • Role clarity
  • Substitutes for leadership

Cite this

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title = "The relationship between abusive supervision, distributive justice and job satisfaction: a substitutes for leadership approach",
abstract = "Introduction: Recently, interest in abusive supervision has grown (Tepper, 2007). However, little is still known about organizational factors that can reduce the adverse effects of abusive supervision. Objective: Based on a substitute for leadership perspective (Kerr & Jermier, 1978), we predict that job resources adequacy and role clarity act as buffers in the negative relationship between abusive supervision, distributive justice and job satisfaction. Method: A sample of 253 employees from a City Hall was used to test our hypotheses. Results: We found that abusive supervision was significant and negatively related to distributive justice when job resources adequacy and role clarity were low, but not when job resources adequacy and role clarity were high, with consequences for job satisfaction. Conclusions: These findings suggest that job resources adequacy and role clarity can reduce the negative impact of abusive supervision, which then lessens distributive unfairness perceptions and job dissatisfaction.",
keywords = "Abusive supervision, Distributive justice, Job resources adequacy, Job satisfaction, Role clarity, Substitutes for leadership",
author = "Velez, {M. J.} and P. Neves",
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AU - Neves, P.

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AB - Introduction: Recently, interest in abusive supervision has grown (Tepper, 2007). However, little is still known about organizational factors that can reduce the adverse effects of abusive supervision. Objective: Based on a substitute for leadership perspective (Kerr & Jermier, 1978), we predict that job resources adequacy and role clarity act as buffers in the negative relationship between abusive supervision, distributive justice and job satisfaction. Method: A sample of 253 employees from a City Hall was used to test our hypotheses. Results: We found that abusive supervision was significant and negatively related to distributive justice when job resources adequacy and role clarity were low, but not when job resources adequacy and role clarity were high, with consequences for job satisfaction. Conclusions: These findings suggest that job resources adequacy and role clarity can reduce the negative impact of abusive supervision, which then lessens distributive unfairness perceptions and job dissatisfaction.

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