The perceived impact of leaders’ humility on team effectiveness: an empirical study

Arménio Rego, Miguel Pina e Cunha, Ace Volkmann Simpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We assess the perceived impact of leaders’ humility (both self and other-reported) on team effectiveness, and how this relationship is mediated by balanced processing of information. Ninety-six leaders (plus 307 subordinates, 96 supervisors, and 656 peers of those leaders) participate in the study. The findings suggest that humility in leaders (as reported by others/peers) is indirectly (i.e., through balanced processing) related to leaders’ perceived impact on team effectiveness. The study also corroborates literature pointing out the benefits of using other-reports (rather than self-reports) to measure humility, and suggests adding humility to the authentic leadership research agenda.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)205-218
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Business Ethics
Volume148
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • Balanced processing
  • Leader humility
  • Leaders’ perceived impact on team effectiveness

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