The occurrence of inorganic contaminants in ‘tronchuda’ cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC.) after large forest fires in Portugal

Marta S. Ventura, H. Cavaco, Inês Margarida Delgado, Inês Coelho, Sandra Gueifão, Marta Martins, Maria Helena Bueno Da Costa, Ana Sofia Matos, Isabel P. Castanheira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

European Mediterranean countries have been affected by unhealthy pollutants released by wildfire smoke. This work aims to determine the inorganic elements, present in the vegetable widely consumed by the rural population, provided by burned areas. Two groups composed the sampling plan; group one before forest fires and group two after forest fires under three campaigns: 1) immediately after forest fires; 2) after rainfall; 3) during springtime. ICP-MS analysed all the samples to evaluate the contents of As, Br, Cd, Co, Cr, Pb, Se, Sr, and Zn. The amounts of trace elements founded were the following Pb < Cd < Co < As < Cr < Se < Zn < Br < Sr. Hierarchical Cluster Analysis evidenced 4 clusters; the first with the highest contents of Cr and Pb, the second cluster was marked by the highest amounts of As, and Br, higher values of Se characterised the third cluster, and the fourth cluster presented the highest values of Zn and Cd. The contents of contaminants in group one is not a matter of concern. The results obtained in group two identified a hazard, decreasing one year after the fires and maintaining these patterns afterwards. Occurrence data from local foods is a pioneer to study the impact of forest fires on human health through food consumption.

Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal Of Environmental Analytical Chemistry
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2021

Keywords

  • cabbage
  • data quality
  • forest fires
  • multivariate statistical analysis
  • public health
  • Trace elements

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The occurrence of inorganic contaminants in ‘tronchuda’ cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. costata DC.) after large forest fires in Portugal'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this