The Mesopotamian primordial ocean(s): changes and continuities on the creative agency of the primeval aquatic deities (3rd and 2nd millennia BC)

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Abstract

The Mesopotamian literary traditions dated to the 3rd and 2nd millennia BC depict a conception regarding the primeval substance, from which all deities and aspects of nature came to exist, as divine ocean(s). The simultaneous cosmogonic and theogonic processes were thus attributed to the agency of the primeval aquatic deities, who alone, in the case of the Sumerian goddess Namma, or in pair, in the case of the Akkadian divine couple Tiāmat and Apsû, set time and cosmic life in motion. Having in mind the cumulative nature of the Mesopotamian religious system, where tradition and innovation were encompassed to accommodate mythical (re)elaborations, this paper will address the differences and continuities that one can identify in the agency of these divine figures.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTradition and Innovation
EditorsMaria do Rosário Monteiro, Mário S. Kong
Place of PublicationLondres
PublisherCRC Press
Pages391-397
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)978-0-367-27766-6
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2021
Event6º Congresso Internacional Multidisciplinar PHI 2020
: Tradição e Inovação
- Faculdade de Arquitectura – Universidade do Porto (FA-UP), Porto , Portugal
Duration: 8 Oct 202010 Oct 2020
Conference number: 6
https://plataforma9.com/congressos/6-congresso-internacional-multidisciplinar-phi-2020-tradicao-e-inovacao.htm
http://phi.fa.ulisboa.pt/index.php/pt/

Publication series

NamePHI

Conference

Conference6º Congresso Internacional Multidisciplinar PHI 2020
CountryPortugal
CityPorto
Period8/10/2010/10/20
Internet address

Keywords

  • History of Religions
  • Sumeo-Akkadian Literature
  • Namma
  • Tiāmat
  • Apsû

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