The influence of two song-teaching strategies on vocal performance among kindergarten to fourth-grade children

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

1.Background Research on the influence of teaching songs starting with the melody sang with a neutral syllable, adding the words later, or in an integrated manner on children’s vocal performances has not been addressed in depth. Furthermore, to our knowledge there are no studies regarding the influence of gender and age on the singing achievement of the same non-familiar songs. 2.Aims This study aims to determine (a) whether children sing better if a song is presented with text or a neutral syllable, (b) whether children sing better the song presented in an integrated manner or the song first presented with a neutral syllable now with text, and (c) whether gender or age affects singing achievement. 3.Method Children aged 4 to 10 (N=135) attending a city private school participated in a two-phase study. Phase one occurred in regular music classes during four weeks presenting a song with a neutral syllable (A) and a song with text (B). Phase two followed during three weeks, adding the text to song A and teaching song B as in the previous phase. Children’s individual performances for both songs were recorded after each phase and rated by three raters using researcher-developed performance rating scales. 4.Results Inter-rater reliabilities were high, ranging from ICC(3, k) = .878 to .951. T-test results for paired samples revealed significantly higher mean scores for song B in phase one (M = .840, SD = 2.007) [t(134) = 4.859; p < .001] and also in phase two (M = .402, SD = 1.820) [t(134) = 2.570; p = .011]. In phase one, results of a two-way ANOVA for the mean difference of scorings of both songs demonstrated that there was a significant interaction between age and gender (F(2,129) = 5.543, p = .005), and significant main effects for age (F(1,129) = 12.921, p < .001) and gender (F(1,129) = 12.748, p = .001), meaning that girls from 4 to 6 years-old perform better in song B than boys of the same age and that this age group has a higher difference between performances (better in song B). In phase two, results showed a significant main effect for age (F(2,129) = 7.497, p = .001), again for kindergarten children as in phase one. 5.Conclusions This study reveals that teaching a song in an integrated manner is better for children’s singing achievement, especially for kindergarten girls and also for this overall age group.
Original languageEnglish
Pages107
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2017
Event6th Conference of the Asia-Pacific Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music - Kyoto Women’s University, Kyoto, Japan
Duration: 25 Aug 201727 Aug 2017
Conference number: 6

Conference

Conference6th Conference of the Asia-Pacific Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music
Abbreviated titleAPSCOM 6
CountryJapan
CityKyoto
Period25/08/1727/08/17

Fingerprint

Music
Teaching
Singing
Cell Division
Age Groups
Analysis of Variance

Keywords

  • Children vocal performance
  • Performance rating scales
  • Song-teaching strategies
  • Songs with neutral syllable
  • Songs with text

Cite this

Pereira, A. I., Rodrigues, H., & Ávila, P. (2017). The influence of two song-teaching strategies on vocal performance among kindergarten to fourth-grade children. 107. Abstract from 6th Conference of the Asia-Pacific Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music , Kyoto, Japan.
Pereira, Ana Isabel ; Rodrigues, Helena ; Ávila, Patrícia. / The influence of two song-teaching strategies on vocal performance among kindergarten to fourth-grade children. Abstract from 6th Conference of the Asia-Pacific Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music , Kyoto, Japan.1 p.
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keywords = "Children vocal performance , Performance rating scales , Song-teaching strategies , Songs with neutral syllable , Songs with text",
author = "Pereira, {Ana Isabel} and Helena Rodrigues and Patr{\'i}cia {\'A}vila",
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Pereira, AI, Rodrigues, H & Ávila, P 2017, 'The influence of two song-teaching strategies on vocal performance among kindergarten to fourth-grade children' 6th Conference of the Asia-Pacific Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music , Kyoto, Japan, 25/08/17 - 27/08/17, pp. 107.

The influence of two song-teaching strategies on vocal performance among kindergarten to fourth-grade children. / Pereira, Ana Isabel; Rodrigues, Helena ; Ávila, Patrícia.

2017. 107 Abstract from 6th Conference of the Asia-Pacific Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music , Kyoto, Japan.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - The influence of two song-teaching strategies on vocal performance among kindergarten to fourth-grade children

AU - Pereira, Ana Isabel

AU - Rodrigues, Helena

AU - Ávila, Patrícia

N1 - info:eu-repo/grantAgreement/FCT/5876/147237/PT# UID/EAT-00693/2013 PD/BD/114489/2016

PY - 2017/8

Y1 - 2017/8

N2 - 1.Background Research on the influence of teaching songs starting with the melody sang with a neutral syllable, adding the words later, or in an integrated manner on children’s vocal performances has not been addressed in depth. Furthermore, to our knowledge there are no studies regarding the influence of gender and age on the singing achievement of the same non-familiar songs. 2.Aims This study aims to determine (a) whether children sing better if a song is presented with text or a neutral syllable, (b) whether children sing better the song presented in an integrated manner or the song first presented with a neutral syllable now with text, and (c) whether gender or age affects singing achievement. 3.Method Children aged 4 to 10 (N=135) attending a city private school participated in a two-phase study. Phase one occurred in regular music classes during four weeks presenting a song with a neutral syllable (A) and a song with text (B). Phase two followed during three weeks, adding the text to song A and teaching song B as in the previous phase. Children’s individual performances for both songs were recorded after each phase and rated by three raters using researcher-developed performance rating scales. 4.Results Inter-rater reliabilities were high, ranging from ICC(3, k) = .878 to .951. T-test results for paired samples revealed significantly higher mean scores for song B in phase one (M = .840, SD = 2.007) [t(134) = 4.859; p < .001] and also in phase two (M = .402, SD = 1.820) [t(134) = 2.570; p = .011]. In phase one, results of a two-way ANOVA for the mean difference of scorings of both songs demonstrated that there was a significant interaction between age and gender (F(2,129) = 5.543, p = .005), and significant main effects for age (F(1,129) = 12.921, p < .001) and gender (F(1,129) = 12.748, p = .001), meaning that girls from 4 to 6 years-old perform better in song B than boys of the same age and that this age group has a higher difference between performances (better in song B). In phase two, results showed a significant main effect for age (F(2,129) = 7.497, p = .001), again for kindergarten children as in phase one. 5.Conclusions This study reveals that teaching a song in an integrated manner is better for children’s singing achievement, especially for kindergarten girls and also for this overall age group.

AB - 1.Background Research on the influence of teaching songs starting with the melody sang with a neutral syllable, adding the words later, or in an integrated manner on children’s vocal performances has not been addressed in depth. Furthermore, to our knowledge there are no studies regarding the influence of gender and age on the singing achievement of the same non-familiar songs. 2.Aims This study aims to determine (a) whether children sing better if a song is presented with text or a neutral syllable, (b) whether children sing better the song presented in an integrated manner or the song first presented with a neutral syllable now with text, and (c) whether gender or age affects singing achievement. 3.Method Children aged 4 to 10 (N=135) attending a city private school participated in a two-phase study. Phase one occurred in regular music classes during four weeks presenting a song with a neutral syllable (A) and a song with text (B). Phase two followed during three weeks, adding the text to song A and teaching song B as in the previous phase. Children’s individual performances for both songs were recorded after each phase and rated by three raters using researcher-developed performance rating scales. 4.Results Inter-rater reliabilities were high, ranging from ICC(3, k) = .878 to .951. T-test results for paired samples revealed significantly higher mean scores for song B in phase one (M = .840, SD = 2.007) [t(134) = 4.859; p < .001] and also in phase two (M = .402, SD = 1.820) [t(134) = 2.570; p = .011]. In phase one, results of a two-way ANOVA for the mean difference of scorings of both songs demonstrated that there was a significant interaction between age and gender (F(2,129) = 5.543, p = .005), and significant main effects for age (F(1,129) = 12.921, p < .001) and gender (F(1,129) = 12.748, p = .001), meaning that girls from 4 to 6 years-old perform better in song B than boys of the same age and that this age group has a higher difference between performances (better in song B). In phase two, results showed a significant main effect for age (F(2,129) = 7.497, p = .001), again for kindergarten children as in phase one. 5.Conclusions This study reveals that teaching a song in an integrated manner is better for children’s singing achievement, especially for kindergarten girls and also for this overall age group.

KW - Children vocal performance

KW - Performance rating scales

KW - Song-teaching strategies

KW - Songs with neutral syllable

KW - Songs with text

M3 - Abstract

SP - 107

ER -

Pereira AI, Rodrigues H, Ávila P. The influence of two song-teaching strategies on vocal performance among kindergarten to fourth-grade children. 2017. Abstract from 6th Conference of the Asia-Pacific Society for the Cognitive Sciences of Music , Kyoto, Japan.