The genotoxicity of an organic solvent mixture: A human biomonitoring study and translation of a real-scenario exposure to in vitro

Carina Ladeira, Goran Gajski, Márcia Meneses, Marko Gerić, Susana Viegas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aimed to evaluate occupational exposure to a styrene and xylene mixture through environmental exposure assessment and identify the potential genotoxic effects through biological monitoring. Secondly, we also exposed human peripheral blood cells in vitro to both xylene and styrene either alone or in mixture at concentrations found in occupational settings in order to understand their mechanism of action. The results obtained by air monitoring were below the occupational exposure limits for both substances. All biomarkers of effect, except for nucleoplasmic bridges, had higher mean values in workers (N = 17) compared to the corresponding controls (N = 17). There were statistically significant associations between exposed individuals and the presence of nuclear buds and oxidative damage. As for in vitro results, there was no significant influence on primary DNA damage in blood cells as evaluated by the comet assay. On the contrary, we did observe a significant increase of micronuclei and nuclear buds, but not nucleoplasmic bridges upon in vitro exposure. Taken together, both styrene and xylene have the potential to induce genomic instability either alone or in combination, showing higher effects when combined. The obtained data suggested that thresholds for individual chemicals might be insufficient for ensuring the protection of human health.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104726
JournalRegulatory Toxicology And Pharmacology
Volume116
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • In vitro
  • Mixtures
  • Monitoring
  • Occupational exposure
  • Styrene
  • Xylene

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