The culture of curiosity at the Royal Society in the first half of the eighteenth century

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper is concerned with the reporting and display of curiosities of nature at the meetings of The Royal Society during the first half of the eighteenth century. It is argued that these activities cannot, as some historians have maintained, be viewed as a mere opportunity for the entertainment of the Fellows. Instead, the reports and exhibitions fulfilled multiple roles, including the promotion of inquiry, education, polite discourse, as well as entertainment, aspects that were intimately connected during that period. Some of the individual and collective interests involved in the reporting and display of curiosities of nature at the Society are also discussed. It is argued that these interests should be considered within the broad context of the culture of curiosity at The Royal Society in this period.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)147-166
Number of pages20
JournalNotes And Records Of The Royal Society
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2002

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The culture of curiosity at the Royal Society in the first half of the eighteenth century'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this