Synthesis, electrospinning and in vitro test of a new biodegradable gelatin-based poly(ester urethane urea) for soft tissue engineering

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biodegradable polyurethanes have been studied as scaffolds for tissue engineering due to their adjustable physico-chemical properties. In this work, we synthesized a biodegradable gelatin-based poly(urethane urea) using polycaprolactone-diol, as soft segment, and isophorone diisocyanate and gelatin from cold water fish skin as hard segment. The synthesis was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance and the influence of the amount of gelatin introduced in the polymer backbone was analyzed by thermal analysis. Gelatin-based poly(urethane urea) electrospun fibrous mats and solvent cast films were then produced and their physico-chemical and biological properties studied. They present an amorphous structure, elastomeric behavior and water contact angles typical of hydrophobic surfaces. Hydrolytic degradation was analyzed in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), lipase and trypsin solutions. No mass changes were detected during 37 days in PBS and trypsin while significant degradation by lipase was observed. Human foetal foreskin fibroblasts were seeded on the fibrous mats and films. Populations were evaluated by colorimetric cell viability assays and morphology by fluorescence imaging. The substrates supported cell adhesion and proliferation. The novel gelatin-based poly(urethane urea) fibrous mats offer attractive physico-chemical and biological properties for soft tissue engineering applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)271-281
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Polymer Journal
Volume103
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

Keywords

  • Biodegradable polyurethane
  • Electrospinning
  • Fish gelatin
  • In vitro tests
  • Soft tissue engineering

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Synthesis, electrospinning and in vitro test of a new biodegradable gelatin-based poly(ester urethane urea) for soft tissue engineering'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this