Stuttering in Parkinson's disease after deep brain stimulation

A note on dystonia and low-frequency stimulation

Marcelo D Mendonça, Raquel Barbosa, Alexandra Seromenho-Santos, Carla Reizinho, Paulo Bugalho, CHLO Movement Disorders Surgery Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Stuttering, a speech fluency disorder, is a rare complication of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's Disease (PD). We report a 61 years-old patient with PD, afflicted by severe On and Off dystonia, treated with Subthalamic Nucleus DBS that developed post-DBS stuttering while on 130 Hz stimulation. Stuttering reduction was noted when frequency was changed to 80 Hz, but the previously observed dystonia improvement was lost. There are no reports in literature on patients developing stuttering with low-frequency stimulation. We question if low-frequency stimulation could have a role for managing PD's post-DBS stuttering, and notice that stuttering improvement was associated with dystonia worsening suggesting that they are distinct phenomena.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)150-151
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
Volume50
Early online date26 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2018

Fingerprint

Stuttering
Deep Brain Stimulation
Dystonia
Parkinson Disease
Speech Disorders
Subthalamic Nucleus

Keywords

  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Dystonia
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Stuttering

Cite this

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title = "Stuttering in Parkinson's disease after deep brain stimulation: A note on dystonia and low-frequency stimulation",
abstract = "Stuttering, a speech fluency disorder, is a rare complication of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's Disease (PD). We report a 61 years-old patient with PD, afflicted by severe On and Off dystonia, treated with Subthalamic Nucleus DBS that developed post-DBS stuttering while on 130 Hz stimulation. Stuttering reduction was noted when frequency was changed to 80 Hz, but the previously observed dystonia improvement was lost. There are no reports in literature on patients developing stuttering with low-frequency stimulation. We question if low-frequency stimulation could have a role for managing PD's post-DBS stuttering, and notice that stuttering improvement was associated with dystonia worsening suggesting that they are distinct phenomena.",
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year = "2018",
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language = "English",
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Stuttering in Parkinson's disease after deep brain stimulation : A note on dystonia and low-frequency stimulation. / Mendonça, Marcelo D; Barbosa, Raquel; Seromenho-Santos, Alexandra; Reizinho, Carla; Bugalho, Paulo; CHLO Movement Disorders Surgery Group.

In: Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia, Vol. 50, 04.2018, p. 150-151.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Stuttering in Parkinson's disease after deep brain stimulation

T2 - A note on dystonia and low-frequency stimulation

AU - Mendonça, Marcelo D

AU - Barbosa, Raquel

AU - Seromenho-Santos, Alexandra

AU - Reizinho, Carla

AU - Bugalho, Paulo

AU - CHLO Movement Disorders Surgery Group

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/4

Y1 - 2018/4

N2 - Stuttering, a speech fluency disorder, is a rare complication of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's Disease (PD). We report a 61 years-old patient with PD, afflicted by severe On and Off dystonia, treated with Subthalamic Nucleus DBS that developed post-DBS stuttering while on 130 Hz stimulation. Stuttering reduction was noted when frequency was changed to 80 Hz, but the previously observed dystonia improvement was lost. There are no reports in literature on patients developing stuttering with low-frequency stimulation. We question if low-frequency stimulation could have a role for managing PD's post-DBS stuttering, and notice that stuttering improvement was associated with dystonia worsening suggesting that they are distinct phenomena.

AB - Stuttering, a speech fluency disorder, is a rare complication of Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in Parkinson's Disease (PD). We report a 61 years-old patient with PD, afflicted by severe On and Off dystonia, treated with Subthalamic Nucleus DBS that developed post-DBS stuttering while on 130 Hz stimulation. Stuttering reduction was noted when frequency was changed to 80 Hz, but the previously observed dystonia improvement was lost. There are no reports in literature on patients developing stuttering with low-frequency stimulation. We question if low-frequency stimulation could have a role for managing PD's post-DBS stuttering, and notice that stuttering improvement was associated with dystonia worsening suggesting that they are distinct phenomena.

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KW - Dystonia

KW - Parkinson's disease

KW - Stuttering

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DO - 10.1016/j.jocn.2018.01.042

M3 - Article

VL - 50

SP - 150

EP - 151

JO - Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia

JF - Journal of clinical neuroscience : official journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia

SN - 0967-5868

ER -