Staphylococcus aureus in former Portuguese colonies from Africa and the Far East: Missing data to help fill the world map

T. Conceição, C. Coelho, I. Santos Silva, H. de Lencastre, M. Aires-de-Sousa

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22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal carriage among patients and healthcare workers in Angola (ANG), São Tomé and Príncipe (STP), Cape Verde (CV) and East Timor (ET), and to characterize the antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence content and population structure of all S.aureus. Despite the importance of MRSA as a major human pathogen, data from these former Portuguese colonies in Africa and Asia are scarce. A total of 2065 nasal swabs recovered between 2010-14 were included in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing and molecular characterization of S.aureus showed: (i) a very high MRSA prevalence in ANG (61.6%), moderate in STP (25.5%), low in CV (5.6%) and null in ET; (ii) a high prevalence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin in STP (36.8%), ET (29.2%) and CV (28.3%) contrasting with ANG (7.9%); (iii) ST5-SCC. mecIVa, ST8-IV/V and ST5-VI were the major MRSA clones in ANG (65.2%), STP (44.8%) and CV (50%), respectively; (iv) a high resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in ANG (66.5%) and STP (50.9%), to rifampin in ANG (77.3%), and to tetracycline in STP (26.3%) and ET (20.8%); (v) three major methicillin-susceptible S.aureus clones (ST15, ST508, ST152) were present in all four countries. Age

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)842.e1-842.e10
JournalClinical Microbiology and Infection
Volume21
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sept 2015

Keywords

  • Africa
  • Angola
  • Cape Verde
  • East Timor
  • Far East
  • Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus
  • Nasal carriage
  • Staphylococcus aureus
  • São Tomé and Príncipe

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