Short-Term Biochemical Biomarkers of Stress in the Oyster Magallana angulata Exposed to Gymnodinium catenatum and Skeletonema marinoi

Rui Cereja, Joana P. C. Cruz, Joshua Heumüller, Bernardo Vicente, Ana Amorim, Frederico Carvalho, Sara Cabral, Paula Chainho, Ana C. Brito, Inês J. Ferreira, Mário Diniz

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Abstract

Bivalves accumulate toxins produced by microalgae, thus becoming harmful for humans. However, little information is available about their toxicity to the bivalve itself. In the present work, the physiological stress and damage after the ingestion of toxic dinoflagellate species (Gymnodinium catenatum) and a diatom species (Skeletonema marinoi, which is non-toxic to humans but may be to grazers) in the oyster Magallana angulata are evaluated against a control treatment fed with the chlorophyte Tetraselmis sp. Oysters were exposed for two hours to a concentration of 4 × 104 cells/L of G. catenatum and 2 × 107 cells/L of S. marinoi. The biomarkers superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione S-Transferase, total Ubiquitin (Ubi) and Acetylcholinesterase (AchE) were assessed. The exposure of M. angulata to G. catenatum lead to a reduction in SOD and AchE activity and ubiquitin concentrations when compared to the control treatment. Moreover, it increased CAT activity in the adductor muscle, and maintained its activity in the other tissues tested. This may be related to the combination of reduced metabolism with the deployment of detoxification processes. S. marinoi also lead to a decrease in all biomarkers tested in the gills and digestive glands. Therefore, both species tested caused physiological alterations in M. angulata after two hours of exposure.
Original languageEnglish
Article number30
Number of pages13
JournalSci
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Jul 2023

Keywords

  • Atlantic oyster
  • PSP
  • PUA
  • stress biomarkers
  • toxic microalgae

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