Revisiting the role of introgression vs shared ancestral polymorphisms as key processes shaping genetic diversity in the recently separated sibling species of the Anopheles gambiae complex

Martin J. Donnelly, J. Pinto, R. Girod, N. J. Besansky, T. Lehmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of interspecific hybridisation in the evolution of pest species is poorly understood. In mosquito disease vectors this is of particular importance due to the evolution of insecticide resistance and the proposed release of transgenic strains that are refractory to the malaria parasite. In this study, we apply population genetic methods in a novel manner to determine whether mitochondrial DNA sequences have introgressed between the closely related African malaria vectors Anopheles gambiae and A. arabiensis. Our results suggest that speciation was geologically recent and ancestral haplotypes at the ND5 locus are retained in both species. In addition, comparing haplotype frequencies in allopatric and sympatric populations, suggest locale specific unidirectional introgression of mitochondria from A. arabiensis into A. gambiae.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-68
Number of pages8
JournalHeredity
Volume92
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2004

Keywords

  • Disease vectors
  • Filariasis
  • Hybridisation
  • Malaria
  • Speciation

UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

  • SDG 3 - Good Health and Well-Being

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