Rendering banana plant residues into a potentially commercial byproduct by doping cellulose films with phenolic compounds

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Abstract

This study seeks to render residues from banana plants into a useful byproduct with possible applications in wound dressings and food packaging. Films based on cellulose extracted from banana plant pseudostem and doped with phenolic compounds extracted from banana plant leaves were developed. The phenolic compounds were extracted using batch solid-liquid and Soxhlet methods, with different drying temperatures and periods of time. The total phenolic content and antioxidant activity were quantified. The optimum values were obtained using a three-day period batch-solid extraction at 40 °C (791.74 ± 43.75 mg/L). SEM analysis indicates that the pseudostem (PS) films have a porous structure, as opposed to hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) films which presented a homogeneous and dense surface. Mechanical properties confirmed the poor robustness of PS films. By contrast HEC films manifested improved tensile strength at low levels of water activity. FTIR spectroscopy reinforced the need to improve the cellulose extraction process, the success of lignin and hemicellulose removal, and the presence of phenolic compounds. XRD, TGA and contact angle analysis showed similar results for both films, with an amorphous structure, thermal stability and hydrophilic behavior.

Original languageEnglish
Article number843
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalPolymers
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Banana plant
  • Cellulose
  • Films
  • Leaves
  • Phenolic compounds
  • Pseudostem

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