Reasoning over ontologies and non-monotonic rules

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2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ontology languages and non-monotonic rule languages are both well-known formalisms in knowledge representation and reasoning, each with its own distinct benefits and features which are quite orthogonal to each other. Both appear in the Semantic Web stack in distinct standards - OWL and RIF - and over the last decade a considerable research effort has been put into trying to provide a framework that combines the two. Yet, the considerable number of theoretical approaches resulted, so far, in very few practical reasoners, while realistic use-cases are scarce. In fact, there is little evidence that developing applications with combinations of ontologies and rules is actually viable. In this paper, we present a tool called NoHR that allows one to reason over ontologies and non-monotonic rules, illustrate its use in a realistic application, and provide tests of scalability of the tool, thereby showing that this research effort can be turned into practice.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Artificial Intelligence - 17th Portuguese Conference on Artificial Intelligence, EPIA 2015, Proceedings
PublisherSpringer-Verlag
Pages388-401
Number of pages14
Volume9273
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-319-23485-4
ISBN (Print)978-3-319-23484-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event17th Portuguese Conference on Artificial Intelligence, EPIA 2015 - Coimbra, Portugal
Duration: 8 Sep 201511 Sep 2015

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume9273
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Conference

Conference17th Portuguese Conference on Artificial Intelligence, EPIA 2015
CountryPortugal
CityCoimbra
Period8/09/1511/09/15

Keywords

  • KNOWLEDGE BASES
  • HYBRID MKNF

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