Popular Political Participation and the Democratic Imagination in Spain: From Crowd to People, 1766-1868

Research output: Book/ReportBook

Abstract

This book addresses the changing relationships among political participation, political representation, and popular mobilization in Spain from the 1766 protest in Madrid against the early Bourbon reforms until the citizen revolution of 1868 that first introduced universal suffrage and led to the ousting of the monarchy.

Popular Participation and the Democratic Imagination in Spain shows that a notion of the “crowd” internally dividing the concept of “people” existed before the advent of Liberalism, allowing for the enduring subordination of popular participation to representation in politics.

In its wider European and colonial American context, the study analyzes semantic changes in a range of cultural spheres, from parliamentary debate to historical narrative and aesthetics. It shows how Liberalism had trouble reproducing the legitimacy of limited suffrage and traces the evolution of an imagination on democracy that would allow for the reconfiguration of an all-encompassing image of the people eventually overcoming representative government.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan UK
Number of pages377
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-030-52596-5
ISBN (Print)978-3-030-52595-8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • Political participation
  • Early Modern History
  • Modern History
  • Political representation
  • Mobilization
  • Citizenship
  • Spain
  • Revolutions
  • Popular culture

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