Physical activity buffers the negative relationship between multimorbidity, self-rated health and life satisfaction

Adilson Marques, Miguel Peralta, Élvio Rúbio Gouveia, Francisco Gómez Chávez, Miguel González Valeiro

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Abstract

Background: This study aimed to examine the relationship between multimorbidity, self-rated health and life satisfaction, and to test the moderating effect of physical activity on the relationship between multimorbidity, self-rated health and life satisfaction.

Methods: This is a cross-sectional study based on data from the European Social Survey 2014. Participants were 25 713 adults (12 830 men), aged 18-64 years old, from 18 European countries and Israel. Self-reported information regarding chronic diseases, health perception, life satisfaction and physical activity was collected through interview. Multimorbidity was defined as the co-occurrence of ≥ 2 chronic diseases. Linear regression models were used to estimate the effects of multimorbidity, physical activity and the interaction effect of multimorbidity × physical activity on self-rated health and life satisfaction.

Results: Multimorbidity was negatively related to self-rated health (d = 0.03) and life satisfaction (d = 0.03). Physical activity was positively related to self-rated health and life satisfaction. There was a significant interaction effect between multimorbidity and physical activity with regard to self-rated health (β = 0.01, P < 0.001) and life satisfaction (β = 0.04, P < 0.001).

Conclusions: Physical activity buffered the negative relationship between multimorbidity, self-rated health and life satisfaction; contributing to better self-rated health and life satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e328-e335
JournalJournal of public health (Oxford, England)
Volume40
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

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