Parental Transmission of Religion and Citizenship among Migrant Muslim Families in Mozambique, Portugal, United Kingdom and Angola

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Abstract

This article discusses the impact of parental religious transmission upon the religious and citizen identities and performances of their offspring, using an ethnographic study on the parenting practices of Sunni and Ismaili migrant families conducted in Portugal, United Kingdom and Angola. The analysis highlights the role of parental religious upbringing in the strengthening of children’s faith and practice but also towards ensuring certain kinds of citizenship that foster pride of affiliation to a given group identity, while simultaneously promoting intergroup identifications and bridging attachments to fellow citizens. In addition, the comparison between migratory contexts shows how parental religious caregiving may help their children reconcile or resist alternative aspects of religiosity and citizenship in different nation-states. These findings represent a stark contrast with official political discourse, which tends to view immigrant religious parenting as simply based on intergenerational continuity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)129-146
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Muslim Minority Affairs
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Apr 2017

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Angola
Mozambique
Portugal
Muslim
religious upbringing
citizenship
migrant
Religion
citizen
Sunni
caregiving
nation state
faith
continuity
immigrant
discourse
performance
Group

Keywords

  • Religion
  • Citizenship
  • Parenting
  • Interfamilial change
  • Immigrant families

Cite this

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abstract = "This article discusses the impact of parental religious transmission upon the religious and citizen identities and performances of their offspring, using an ethnographic study on the parenting practices of Sunni and Ismaili migrant families conducted in Portugal, United Kingdom and Angola. The analysis highlights the role of parental religious upbringing in the strengthening of children’s faith and practice but also towards ensuring certain kinds of citizenship that foster pride of affiliation to a given group identity, while simultaneously promoting intergroup identifications and bridging attachments to fellow citizens. In addition, the comparison between migratory contexts shows how parental religious caregiving may help their children reconcile or resist alternative aspects of religiosity and citizenship in different nation-states. These findings represent a stark contrast with official political discourse, which tends to view immigrant religious parenting as simply based on intergenerational continuity.",
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