New yeasts-new brews

Modern approaches to brewing yeast design and development

Brian R. Gibson, J. M.A. Geertman, C. T. Hittinger, K. Krogerus, D. Libkind, E. J. Louis, F. Magalhães, J. P. Sampaio

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The brewing industry is experiencing a period of change and experimentation largely driven by customer demand for product diversity. This has coincided with a greater appreciation of the role of yeast in determining the character of beer and the widespread availability of powerful tools for yeast research. Genome analysis in particular has helped clarify the processes leading to domestication of brewing yeast and has identified domestication signatures that may be exploited for further yeast development. The functional properties of non-conventional yeast (both Saccharomyces and non- Saccharomyces) are being assessed with a view to creating beers with new flavours as well as producing flavoursome non-alcoholic beers. The discovery of the psychrotolerant S. eubayanus has stimulated research on de novo S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus hybrids for low-temperature lager brewing and has led to renewed interest in the functional importance of hybrid organisms and the mechanisms that determine hybrid genome function and stability. The greater diversity of yeast that can be applied in brewing, along with an improved understanding of yeasts' evolutionary history and biology, is expected to have a significant and direct impact on the brewing industry, with potential for improved brewing efficiency, product diversity and, above all, customer satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish
JournalFems Yeast Research
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Yeasts
Saccharomyces
Industry
Genomic Instability
Research
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
History
Genome
Temperature
Domestication

Keywords

  • Beer
  • Flavour
  • Yeast

Cite this

Gibson, B. R., Geertman, J. M. A., Hittinger, C. T., Krogerus, K., Libkind, D., Louis, E. J., ... Sampaio, J. P. (2017). New yeasts-new brews: Modern approaches to brewing yeast design and development. Fems Yeast Research, 17(4). https://doi.org/10.1093/femsyr/fox038
Gibson, Brian R. ; Geertman, J. M.A. ; Hittinger, C. T. ; Krogerus, K. ; Libkind, D. ; Louis, E. J. ; Magalhães, F. ; Sampaio, J. P. / New yeasts-new brews : Modern approaches to brewing yeast design and development. In: Fems Yeast Research. 2017 ; Vol. 17, No. 4.
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abstract = "The brewing industry is experiencing a period of change and experimentation largely driven by customer demand for product diversity. This has coincided with a greater appreciation of the role of yeast in determining the character of beer and the widespread availability of powerful tools for yeast research. Genome analysis in particular has helped clarify the processes leading to domestication of brewing yeast and has identified domestication signatures that may be exploited for further yeast development. The functional properties of non-conventional yeast (both Saccharomyces and non- Saccharomyces) are being assessed with a view to creating beers with new flavours as well as producing flavoursome non-alcoholic beers. The discovery of the psychrotolerant S. eubayanus has stimulated research on de novo S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus hybrids for low-temperature lager brewing and has led to renewed interest in the functional importance of hybrid organisms and the mechanisms that determine hybrid genome function and stability. The greater diversity of yeast that can be applied in brewing, along with an improved understanding of yeasts' evolutionary history and biology, is expected to have a significant and direct impact on the brewing industry, with potential for improved brewing efficiency, product diversity and, above all, customer satisfaction.",
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author = "Gibson, {Brian R.} and Geertman, {J. M.A.} and Hittinger, {C. T.} and K. Krogerus and D. Libkind and Louis, {E. J.} and F. Magalh{\~a}es and Sampaio, {J. P.}",
note = "Work at VTT was supported by the Alfred Kordelin Foundation, Svenska Kulturfonden-The Swedish Cultural Foundation in Finland, PBL Brewing Laboratory, the Academy of Finland (Academy Projects 276480 and 305453) and the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme FP7/2007-2013/under REA grant agreement 555 no. 606795. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DEB-1253634, by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Hatch Project 1003258, and funded in part by the DOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (DOE Office of Science BER DE-FC02-07ER64494). CTH is a Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences, supported by the Pew Charitable Trusts. This material is based upon work supported by grant UID/Multi/04378/2013 from Fundacao para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia, Portugal. The work at GACT is supported by the BBSRC. Work at IPATEC is supported by Universidad Nacional del Comahue, CONICET (grant PIP424), FONCyT (grants PICT3677 and PICT2542) and COFECyT.",
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New yeasts-new brews : Modern approaches to brewing yeast design and development. / Gibson, Brian R.; Geertman, J. M.A.; Hittinger, C. T.; Krogerus, K.; Libkind, D.; Louis, E. J.; Magalhães, F.; Sampaio, J. P.

In: Fems Yeast Research, Vol. 17, No. 4, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

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T2 - Modern approaches to brewing yeast design and development

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AU - Geertman, J. M.A.

AU - Hittinger, C. T.

AU - Krogerus, K.

AU - Libkind, D.

AU - Louis, E. J.

AU - Magalhães, F.

AU - Sampaio, J. P.

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PY - 2017

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N2 - The brewing industry is experiencing a period of change and experimentation largely driven by customer demand for product diversity. This has coincided with a greater appreciation of the role of yeast in determining the character of beer and the widespread availability of powerful tools for yeast research. Genome analysis in particular has helped clarify the processes leading to domestication of brewing yeast and has identified domestication signatures that may be exploited for further yeast development. The functional properties of non-conventional yeast (both Saccharomyces and non- Saccharomyces) are being assessed with a view to creating beers with new flavours as well as producing flavoursome non-alcoholic beers. The discovery of the psychrotolerant S. eubayanus has stimulated research on de novo S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus hybrids for low-temperature lager brewing and has led to renewed interest in the functional importance of hybrid organisms and the mechanisms that determine hybrid genome function and stability. The greater diversity of yeast that can be applied in brewing, along with an improved understanding of yeasts' evolutionary history and biology, is expected to have a significant and direct impact on the brewing industry, with potential for improved brewing efficiency, product diversity and, above all, customer satisfaction.

AB - The brewing industry is experiencing a period of change and experimentation largely driven by customer demand for product diversity. This has coincided with a greater appreciation of the role of yeast in determining the character of beer and the widespread availability of powerful tools for yeast research. Genome analysis in particular has helped clarify the processes leading to domestication of brewing yeast and has identified domestication signatures that may be exploited for further yeast development. The functional properties of non-conventional yeast (both Saccharomyces and non- Saccharomyces) are being assessed with a view to creating beers with new flavours as well as producing flavoursome non-alcoholic beers. The discovery of the psychrotolerant S. eubayanus has stimulated research on de novo S. cerevisiae × S. eubayanus hybrids for low-temperature lager brewing and has led to renewed interest in the functional importance of hybrid organisms and the mechanisms that determine hybrid genome function and stability. The greater diversity of yeast that can be applied in brewing, along with an improved understanding of yeasts' evolutionary history and biology, is expected to have a significant and direct impact on the brewing industry, with potential for improved brewing efficiency, product diversity and, above all, customer satisfaction.

KW - Beer

KW - Flavour

KW - Yeast

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U2 - 10.1093/femsyr/fox038

DO - 10.1093/femsyr/fox038

M3 - Short survey

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JO - Fems Yeast Research

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Gibson BR, Geertman JMA, Hittinger CT, Krogerus K, Libkind D, Louis EJ et al. New yeasts-new brews: Modern approaches to brewing yeast design and development. Fems Yeast Research. 2017;17(4). https://doi.org/10.1093/femsyr/fox038