New oral anticoagulants: Where does the treating neurologist stand? Atrial Fibrillation: Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment Options

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with a five-fold increased risk of ischemic stroke and accounts for approximately 25% of all strokes in patients older than 80 years. AFrelated stroke tends to be more severe and is associated with a higher rate of recurrence. Vitamin K antagonist therapy reduces the risk of stroke in AF by about two-thirds, but their use is limited mainly by the need for regular laboratory monitoring, low levels of therapy initiation and the risk for bleeding. New oral anticoagulants may provide more stable and predictable anticoagulation at fixed doses without requiring a frequent laboratory monitoring and, more importantly, are at least as effective as warfarin in preventing strokes, while providing a lower risk of bleeding, especially intracranial hemorrhage. Subgroup analysis suggested that their effects are probably consistent either drugs are used for primary prevention of initial stroke or for secondary prevention of recurrent stroke, in patient with AF. The ongoing addition of these new therapeutic agents to the armamentarium used to treat patients with atrial fibrillation will allow to improve the proportion of patients who are appropriately and effectively anticoagulated and, therefore, to reduce the incidence and burden of AF-related stroke. © 2014 by Nova Science Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationNew oral anticoagulants: Where does the treating neurologist stand?: Atrial Fibrillation: Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment Options
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages295-302
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)9781629489285 (ISBN); 9781629489261 (ISBN)
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'New oral anticoagulants: Where does the treating neurologist stand? Atrial Fibrillation: Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment Options'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this