Abstract

Although the neurotoxic and genotoxic potential of acrylamide has been established in freshwater fish, the full breadth of the toxicological consequences induced by this xenobiotic has not yet been disclosed, particularly in aquatic invertebrates. To assess the effects of acrylamide on a bivalve model, the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), two different setups were accomplished: 1) acute exposure to several concentrations of waterborne acrylamide to determine lethality thresholds of the substance and 2) chronic exposure to more reduced acrylamide concentrations to survey phases I and II metabolic endpoints and to perform a whole-body screening for histopathological alterations. Acute toxicity was low (LC50 approximate to 400 mg/L). However, mussels were responsive to prolonged exposure to chronic concentrations of waterborne acrylamide (1-10 mg/L), yielding a significant increase in lipid peroxidation plus EROD and GST activities. Still, total anti-oxidant capacity was not exceeded. In addition, no neurotoxic effects could be determined through acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. The findings suggest aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr)-dependent responses in mussels exposed to acrylamide, although reduced comparatively to vertebrates. No significant histological damage was found in digestive gland or gills but female gonads endured severe necrosis and oocyte atresia. Altogether, the results indicate that acrylamide may induce gonadotoxicity in mussels, although the subject should benefit from further research. Altogether, the findings suggest that the risk of acrylamide to aquatic animals, especially molluscs, may be underestimated. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-62
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Research
Volume135
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2014

Keywords

  • Acrylamide
  • Mussels
  • Chronic exposure
  • Oxidative stress
  • Reproductive toxicity
  • Histopathology
  • INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS
  • REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY
  • ADDUCT FORMATION
  • C-14 ACRYLAMIDE
  • MUSSEL
  • RATS
  • NEUROTOXICITY
  • MECHANISMS
  • MONOMER
  • WATER

Cite this

@article{2bcd964842684377a60220b97ba092af,
title = "Metabolic and histopathological alterations in the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis induced by chronic exposure to acrylamide",
abstract = "Although the neurotoxic and genotoxic potential of acrylamide has been established in freshwater fish, the full breadth of the toxicological consequences induced by this xenobiotic has not yet been disclosed, particularly in aquatic invertebrates. To assess the effects of acrylamide on a bivalve model, the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), two different setups were accomplished: 1) acute exposure to several concentrations of waterborne acrylamide to determine lethality thresholds of the substance and 2) chronic exposure to more reduced acrylamide concentrations to survey phases I and II metabolic endpoints and to perform a whole-body screening for histopathological alterations. Acute toxicity was low (LC50 approximate to 400 mg/L). However, mussels were responsive to prolonged exposure to chronic concentrations of waterborne acrylamide (1-10 mg/L), yielding a significant increase in lipid peroxidation plus EROD and GST activities. Still, total anti-oxidant capacity was not exceeded. In addition, no neurotoxic effects could be determined through acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. The findings suggest aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr)-dependent responses in mussels exposed to acrylamide, although reduced comparatively to vertebrates. No significant histological damage was found in digestive gland or gills but female gonads endured severe necrosis and oocyte atresia. Altogether, the results indicate that acrylamide may induce gonadotoxicity in mussels, although the subject should benefit from further research. Altogether, the findings suggest that the risk of acrylamide to aquatic animals, especially molluscs, may be underestimated. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Acrylamide, Mussels, Chronic exposure, Oxidative stress, Reproductive toxicity, Histopathology, INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS, REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY, ADDUCT FORMATION, C-14 ACRYLAMIDE, MUSSEL, RATS, NEUROTOXICITY, MECHANISMS, MONOMER, WATER",
author = "Miguel Larguinho and Ana Cordeiro and M{\'a}rio Diniz and Costa, {Pedro M.} and Pedro Baptista",
year = "2014",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.envres.2014.09.004",
language = "English",
volume = "135",
pages = "55--62",
journal = "Environmental Research",
issn = "0013-9351",
publisher = "ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Metabolic and histopathological alterations in the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis induced by chronic exposure to acrylamide

AU - Larguinho, Miguel

AU - Cordeiro, Ana

AU - Diniz, Mário

AU - Costa, Pedro M.

AU - Baptista, Pedro

PY - 2014/11

Y1 - 2014/11

N2 - Although the neurotoxic and genotoxic potential of acrylamide has been established in freshwater fish, the full breadth of the toxicological consequences induced by this xenobiotic has not yet been disclosed, particularly in aquatic invertebrates. To assess the effects of acrylamide on a bivalve model, the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), two different setups were accomplished: 1) acute exposure to several concentrations of waterborne acrylamide to determine lethality thresholds of the substance and 2) chronic exposure to more reduced acrylamide concentrations to survey phases I and II metabolic endpoints and to perform a whole-body screening for histopathological alterations. Acute toxicity was low (LC50 approximate to 400 mg/L). However, mussels were responsive to prolonged exposure to chronic concentrations of waterborne acrylamide (1-10 mg/L), yielding a significant increase in lipid peroxidation plus EROD and GST activities. Still, total anti-oxidant capacity was not exceeded. In addition, no neurotoxic effects could be determined through acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. The findings suggest aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr)-dependent responses in mussels exposed to acrylamide, although reduced comparatively to vertebrates. No significant histological damage was found in digestive gland or gills but female gonads endured severe necrosis and oocyte atresia. Altogether, the results indicate that acrylamide may induce gonadotoxicity in mussels, although the subject should benefit from further research. Altogether, the findings suggest that the risk of acrylamide to aquatic animals, especially molluscs, may be underestimated. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - Although the neurotoxic and genotoxic potential of acrylamide has been established in freshwater fish, the full breadth of the toxicological consequences induced by this xenobiotic has not yet been disclosed, particularly in aquatic invertebrates. To assess the effects of acrylamide on a bivalve model, the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), two different setups were accomplished: 1) acute exposure to several concentrations of waterborne acrylamide to determine lethality thresholds of the substance and 2) chronic exposure to more reduced acrylamide concentrations to survey phases I and II metabolic endpoints and to perform a whole-body screening for histopathological alterations. Acute toxicity was low (LC50 approximate to 400 mg/L). However, mussels were responsive to prolonged exposure to chronic concentrations of waterborne acrylamide (1-10 mg/L), yielding a significant increase in lipid peroxidation plus EROD and GST activities. Still, total anti-oxidant capacity was not exceeded. In addition, no neurotoxic effects could be determined through acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. The findings suggest aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr)-dependent responses in mussels exposed to acrylamide, although reduced comparatively to vertebrates. No significant histological damage was found in digestive gland or gills but female gonads endured severe necrosis and oocyte atresia. Altogether, the results indicate that acrylamide may induce gonadotoxicity in mussels, although the subject should benefit from further research. Altogether, the findings suggest that the risk of acrylamide to aquatic animals, especially molluscs, may be underestimated. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KW - Acrylamide

KW - Mussels

KW - Chronic exposure

KW - Oxidative stress

KW - Reproductive toxicity

KW - Histopathology

KW - INDUCED OXIDATIVE STRESS

KW - REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY

KW - ADDUCT FORMATION

KW - C-14 ACRYLAMIDE

KW - MUSSEL

KW - RATS

KW - NEUROTOXICITY

KW - MECHANISMS

KW - MONOMER

KW - WATER

U2 - 10.1016/j.envres.2014.09.004

DO - 10.1016/j.envres.2014.09.004

M3 - Article

VL - 135

SP - 55

EP - 62

JO - Environmental Research

JF - Environmental Research

SN - 0013-9351

ER -