Melanin processing by keratinocytes

A non-microbial type of host-pathogen interaction?

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

The mechanisms that regulate skin pigmentation have been the subject of intense research in recent decades. In contrast with melanin biogenesis and transport within melanocytes, little is known about how melanin is transferred and processed within keratinocytes. Several models have been proposed for how melanin is transferred, with strong evidence supporting coupled exo/endocytosis. Recently, two reports suggest that upon internalization, melanin is stored within keratinocytes in an arrested compartment, allowing the pigment to persist for long periods. In this commentary, we identify a striking parallelism between melanin processing within keratinocytes and the host-pathogen interaction with Plasmodium, opening new avenues to understand the complex molecular mechanisms that ensure skin pigmentation and photoprotection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)301-304
Number of pages4
JournalTraffic
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Apr 2019

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Host-Pathogen Interactions
Melanins
Pathogens
Keratinocytes
Skin Pigmentation
Processing
Skin
Plasmodium
Melanocytes
Endocytosis
Pigments
Research

Keywords

  • autophagy
  • endocytic pathway
  • melanin
  • membrane traffic
  • Plasmodium
  • UV-radiation

Cite this

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title = "Melanin processing by keratinocytes: A non-microbial type of host-pathogen interaction?",
abstract = "The mechanisms that regulate skin pigmentation have been the subject of intense research in recent decades. In contrast with melanin biogenesis and transport within melanocytes, little is known about how melanin is transferred and processed within keratinocytes. Several models have been proposed for how melanin is transferred, with strong evidence supporting coupled exo/endocytosis. Recently, two reports suggest that upon internalization, melanin is stored within keratinocytes in an arrested compartment, allowing the pigment to persist for long periods. In this commentary, we identify a striking parallelism between melanin processing within keratinocytes and the host-pathogen interaction with Plasmodium, opening new avenues to understand the complex molecular mechanisms that ensure skin pigmentation and photoprotection.",
keywords = "autophagy, endocytic pathway, melanin, membrane traffic, Plasmodium, UV-radiation",
author = "Hugo Moreiras and Mafalda Lopes-da-Silva and Seabra, {Miguel C.} and Barral, {Duarte C.}",
year = "2019",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Melanin processing by keratinocytes

T2 - A non-microbial type of host-pathogen interaction?

AU - Moreiras, Hugo

AU - Lopes-da-Silva, Mafalda

AU - Seabra, Miguel C.

AU - Barral, Duarte C.

PY - 2019/4/23

Y1 - 2019/4/23

N2 - The mechanisms that regulate skin pigmentation have been the subject of intense research in recent decades. In contrast with melanin biogenesis and transport within melanocytes, little is known about how melanin is transferred and processed within keratinocytes. Several models have been proposed for how melanin is transferred, with strong evidence supporting coupled exo/endocytosis. Recently, two reports suggest that upon internalization, melanin is stored within keratinocytes in an arrested compartment, allowing the pigment to persist for long periods. In this commentary, we identify a striking parallelism between melanin processing within keratinocytes and the host-pathogen interaction with Plasmodium, opening new avenues to understand the complex molecular mechanisms that ensure skin pigmentation and photoprotection.

AB - The mechanisms that regulate skin pigmentation have been the subject of intense research in recent decades. In contrast with melanin biogenesis and transport within melanocytes, little is known about how melanin is transferred and processed within keratinocytes. Several models have been proposed for how melanin is transferred, with strong evidence supporting coupled exo/endocytosis. Recently, two reports suggest that upon internalization, melanin is stored within keratinocytes in an arrested compartment, allowing the pigment to persist for long periods. In this commentary, we identify a striking parallelism between melanin processing within keratinocytes and the host-pathogen interaction with Plasmodium, opening new avenues to understand the complex molecular mechanisms that ensure skin pigmentation and photoprotection.

KW - autophagy

KW - endocytic pathway

KW - melanin

KW - membrane traffic

KW - Plasmodium

KW - UV-radiation

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U2 - 10.1111/tra.12638

DO - 10.1111/tra.12638

M3 - Comment/debate

VL - 20

SP - 301

EP - 304

JO - Traffic

JF - Traffic

SN - 1398-9219

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