Massive introgression drives species radiation at the range limit of Anopheles gambiae

José L. Vicente, Christopher S. Clarkson, Beniamino Caputo, Bruno Gomes, Marco Pombi, Carla A. Sousa, Tiago Antao, Joaõ DInis, Giordano Bottà, Emiliano Mancini, Vincenzo Petrarca, Daniel Mead, Eleanor Drury, James Stalker, Alistair Miles, Dominic P. Kwiatkowski, Martin J. Donnelly, Amabélia Rodrigues, Alessandra Della Torre, David WeetmanJoão Pinto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Impacts of introgressive hybridisation may range from genomic erosion and species collapse to rapid adaptation and speciation but opportunities to study these dynamics are rare. We investigated the extent, causes and consequences of a hybrid zone between Anopheles coluzzii and Anopheles gambiae in Guinea-Bissau, where high hybridisation rates appear to be stable at least since the 1990s. Anopheles gambiae was genetically partitioned into inland and coastal subpopulations, separated by a central region dominated by A. coluzzii. Surprisingly, whole genome sequencing revealed that the coastal region harbours a hybrid form characterised by an A. gambiae-like sex chromosome and massive introgression of A. coluzzii autosomal alleles. Local selection on chromosomal inversions may play a role in this process, suggesting potential for spatiotemporal stability of the coastal hybrid form and providing resilience against introgression of medically-important loci and traits, found to be more prevalent in inland A. gambiae.

Original languageEnglish
Article number46451
Number of pages13
JournalScientific Reports
Volume7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2017

Keywords

  • MALARIA VECTOR MOSQUITOS
  • MOLECULAR-FORMS
  • GENE-FLOW
  • INCIPIENT SPECIATION
  • POPULATION-STRUCTURE
  • S FORMS
  • ASYMMETRIC INTROGRESSION;
  • ADAPTIVE INTROGRESSION;
  • INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE
  • GENOMIC DIVERGENCE

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