Knowing 'Mozambican Islam': The Confidential Questionnaire on Islam and colonial governance during the liberation war

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Abstract

Previous research on the colonial governance of Islam discloses that the British, Dutch, French and Portuguese Empires devoted particular attention to the study, surveillance and control of Muslim populations (Robinson and Triaud 1997, Thomas 2008, Ferris 2009, Maussen and Bader 2011). Although there were diverse political approaches, and each occurred in different colonial and historical contexts, there is a degree of commonality in their strategies towards Muslims. The ‘Orientalist’ (Said 1978) approach to Islam upheld notions of European superiority and legitimised colonial rule. Its representations and concerns led to the production of similar discourses that focused on both real and imaginary political implications of the religious beliefs and practices of Muslims, conceiving them to be potentially subversive and a colonial security concern (Hallet 1976, Robinson and Triaud 1997, Harrison 2003, Luizard 2006, Simpson and Kresse 2007, Thomas 2008, Ferris 2009, Trumbull IV 2009). The transnational character of Muslim societies and indeed of Islam itself that had no regard for colonial boundaries deepened these anxieties (Maussen and Bader 2011: 14).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationColonial Policing and the Transnational Legacy
Subtitle of host publicationThe Global Dynamics of Policing Across the Lusophone Community
EditorsConor O'Reilly
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter5
Number of pages24
Edition1
ISBN (Print)9781317164142
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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