King of Sumer and Akkad' and 'King of Kardunias', and the Assyro-Babylonian relationship during the Sargonid Period

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Abstract

From the earliest Mesopotamian literature, royal inscriptions were written with the need to commemorate and preserve the king’s deeds. Along with several literary devices, titles and epithets were denotative elements bounded together on an archetypal approach to Near Eastern kingship. Despite the biasness of their contents, they were still part of a geopolitical and sociocultural environment. The references to both Tukultī-ninurta I and Šamšī-adad V (who ruled during the Middle and Early NeoAssyrian periods, respectively) provide a theoretical framework on the incorporation of Southern royal titles among Assyrian royal inscriptions. These include titles such as ‘King of Sumer and Akkad’, ‘King of Karduniaš’, among others. However, the rise of the Sargonids (VIII-VII BC) accentuates the malleability of these titles
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)20-35
Number of pages17
JournalRosetta
Volume19
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Neo-Assyrian Empire
  • Royal Inscriptions
  • Assyro-Babylonian relationship
  • Titles
  • Epithets

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