Implementation strategies to increase access and demand of long-lasting insecticidal nets:

a before-and-after study and scale-up process in Mozambique

Jorge A H Arroz, Chandana Mendis, Liliana Pinto, Baltazar Candrinho, J Pinto, MR Martins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND:
The universal coverage bed nets campaign is a proven health intervention promoting increased access, ownership, and use of bed nets to reduce malaria burden. This article describes the intervention and implementation strategies that Mozambique carried out recently in order to improve access and increase demand for long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs).

METHODS:
A before-and-after study with a control group was used during Stage I of the implementation process. The following strategies were tested in Stage I: (1) use of coupons during household registration; (2) use of stickers to identify the registered households; (3) new LLIN ascription formula (one LLIN for every two people). In Stage II, the following additional strategies were implemented: (4) mapping and micro-planning; (5) training; and (6) supervision. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to compare and establish differences between intervened and control districts in Stage I. Main outcomes were: percentage of LLINs distributed, percentage of target households benefited.

RESULTS:
In Stage I, 87.8% (302,648) of planned LLINs were distributed in the intervention districts compared to 77.1% (219,613) in the control districts [OR: 2.14 (95% CI 2.11-2.16)]. Stage I results also showed that 80.6% (110,453) of households received at least one LLIN in the intervention districts compared to 72.8% (87,636) in the control districts [OR: 1.56 (95% CI 1.53-1.59)]. In Stage II, 98.4% (3,536,839) of the allocated LLINs were delivered, covering 98.6% (1,353,827) of the registered households.

CONCLUSIONS:
Stage I results achieved better LLINs and household coverage in districts with the newly implemented strategies. The results of stage II were also encouraging. Additional strategies adaptation is required for a wide-country LLIN campaign
Original languageEnglish
Article number429
Pages (from-to)p. 429-438
Number of pages9
JournalMalaria Journal
VolumeVol. 16
Issue numbern.º 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Oct 2017

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Mozambique
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Universal Coverage
Ownership
Malaria
Control Groups
Health

Keywords

  • Before-and-after design
  • Implementation strategies
  • Implementation study
  • Long-lasting insecticidal nets
  • Universal coverage bed nets campaign
  • Mozambique

Cite this

Arroz, Jorge A H ; Mendis, Chandana ; Pinto, Liliana ; Candrinho, Baltazar ; Pinto, J ; Martins, MR. / Implementation strategies to increase access and demand of long-lasting insecticidal nets: a before-and-after study and scale-up process in Mozambique. In: Malaria Journal. 2017 ; Vol. Vol. 16, No. n.º 1. pp. p. 429-438.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND:The universal coverage bed nets campaign is a proven health intervention promoting increased access, ownership, and use of bed nets to reduce malaria burden. This article describes the intervention and implementation strategies that Mozambique carried out recently in order to improve access and increase demand for long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs).METHODS:A before-and-after study with a control group was used during Stage I of the implementation process. The following strategies were tested in Stage I: (1) use of coupons during household registration; (2) use of stickers to identify the registered households; (3) new LLIN ascription formula (one LLIN for every two people). In Stage II, the following additional strategies were implemented: (4) mapping and micro-planning; (5) training; and (6) supervision. Odds ratio (OR) and 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) were used to compare and establish differences between intervened and control districts in Stage I. Main outcomes were: percentage of LLINs distributed, percentage of target households benefited.RESULTS:In Stage I, 87.8{\%} (302,648) of planned LLINs were distributed in the intervention districts compared to 77.1{\%} (219,613) in the control districts [OR: 2.14 (95{\%} CI 2.11-2.16)]. Stage I results also showed that 80.6{\%} (110,453) of households received at least one LLIN in the intervention districts compared to 72.8{\%} (87,636) in the control districts [OR: 1.56 (95{\%} CI 1.53-1.59)]. In Stage II, 98.4{\%} (3,536,839) of the allocated LLINs were delivered, covering 98.6{\%} (1,353,827) of the registered households.CONCLUSIONS:Stage I results achieved better LLINs and household coverage in districts with the newly implemented strategies. The results of stage II were also encouraging. Additional strategies adaptation is required for a wide-country LLIN campaign",
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Implementation strategies to increase access and demand of long-lasting insecticidal nets: a before-and-after study and scale-up process in Mozambique. / Arroz, Jorge A H; Mendis, Chandana; Pinto, Liliana; Candrinho, Baltazar; Pinto, J; Martins, MR.

In: Malaria Journal, Vol. Vol. 16, No. n.º 1, 429, 25.10.2017, p. p. 429-438.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Implementation strategies to increase access and demand of long-lasting insecticidal nets:

T2 - a before-and-after study and scale-up process in Mozambique

AU - Arroz, Jorge A H

AU - Mendis, Chandana

AU - Pinto, Liliana

AU - Candrinho, Baltazar

AU - Pinto, J

AU - Martins, MR

PY - 2017/10/25

Y1 - 2017/10/25

N2 - BACKGROUND:The universal coverage bed nets campaign is a proven health intervention promoting increased access, ownership, and use of bed nets to reduce malaria burden. This article describes the intervention and implementation strategies that Mozambique carried out recently in order to improve access and increase demand for long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs).METHODS:A before-and-after study with a control group was used during Stage I of the implementation process. The following strategies were tested in Stage I: (1) use of coupons during household registration; (2) use of stickers to identify the registered households; (3) new LLIN ascription formula (one LLIN for every two people). In Stage II, the following additional strategies were implemented: (4) mapping and micro-planning; (5) training; and (6) supervision. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to compare and establish differences between intervened and control districts in Stage I. Main outcomes were: percentage of LLINs distributed, percentage of target households benefited.RESULTS:In Stage I, 87.8% (302,648) of planned LLINs were distributed in the intervention districts compared to 77.1% (219,613) in the control districts [OR: 2.14 (95% CI 2.11-2.16)]. Stage I results also showed that 80.6% (110,453) of households received at least one LLIN in the intervention districts compared to 72.8% (87,636) in the control districts [OR: 1.56 (95% CI 1.53-1.59)]. In Stage II, 98.4% (3,536,839) of the allocated LLINs were delivered, covering 98.6% (1,353,827) of the registered households.CONCLUSIONS:Stage I results achieved better LLINs and household coverage in districts with the newly implemented strategies. The results of stage II were also encouraging. Additional strategies adaptation is required for a wide-country LLIN campaign

AB - BACKGROUND:The universal coverage bed nets campaign is a proven health intervention promoting increased access, ownership, and use of bed nets to reduce malaria burden. This article describes the intervention and implementation strategies that Mozambique carried out recently in order to improve access and increase demand for long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs).METHODS:A before-and-after study with a control group was used during Stage I of the implementation process. The following strategies were tested in Stage I: (1) use of coupons during household registration; (2) use of stickers to identify the registered households; (3) new LLIN ascription formula (one LLIN for every two people). In Stage II, the following additional strategies were implemented: (4) mapping and micro-planning; (5) training; and (6) supervision. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were used to compare and establish differences between intervened and control districts in Stage I. Main outcomes were: percentage of LLINs distributed, percentage of target households benefited.RESULTS:In Stage I, 87.8% (302,648) of planned LLINs were distributed in the intervention districts compared to 77.1% (219,613) in the control districts [OR: 2.14 (95% CI 2.11-2.16)]. Stage I results also showed that 80.6% (110,453) of households received at least one LLIN in the intervention districts compared to 72.8% (87,636) in the control districts [OR: 1.56 (95% CI 1.53-1.59)]. In Stage II, 98.4% (3,536,839) of the allocated LLINs were delivered, covering 98.6% (1,353,827) of the registered households.CONCLUSIONS:Stage I results achieved better LLINs and household coverage in districts with the newly implemented strategies. The results of stage II were also encouraging. Additional strategies adaptation is required for a wide-country LLIN campaign

KW - Before-and-after design

KW - Implementation strategies

KW - Implementation study

KW - Long-lasting insecticidal nets

KW - Universal coverage bed nets campaign

KW - Mozambique

UR - https://malariajournal.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s12936-017-2086-3

U2 - 10.1186/s12936-017-2086-3

DO - 10.1186/s12936-017-2086-3

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JO - Malaria Journal

JF - Malaria Journal

SN - 1475-2875

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