High colonization rate and heterogeneity of ESBL-and carbapenemase-producing enterobacteriaceae isolated from gull feces in Lisbon, Portugal

Marta Aires-De-sousa, Claudine Fournier, Elizeth Lopes, Hermínia de Lencastre, Patrice Nordmann, Laurent Poirel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to evaluate whether seagulls living on the Lisbon coastline, Portugal, might be colonized and consequently represent potential spreaders of multidrug-resistant bacteria, a total of 88 gull fecal samples were screened for detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and for vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE). A large proportion of samples yielded carbapenemase-or ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (16% and 55%, respectively), while only two MRSA and two VRE were detected. Mating-out assays followed by PCR and whole-plasmid sequencing allowed to identify carbapenemase and ESBL encoding genes. Among 24 carbapenemase-producing isolates, there were mainly Klebsiella pneumoniae (50%) and Escherichia coli (33%). OXA-181 was the most common carbapenemase identified (54%), followed by OXA-48 (25%) and KPC-2 (17%). Ten different ESBLs were found among 62 ESBL-producing isolates, mainly being CTX-M-type enzymes (87%). Co-occurrence in single samples of multiple ESBL-and carbapenemase producers belonging to different bacterial species was observed in some cases. Seagulls constitute an important source for spreading multidrug-resistant bacteria in the environment and their gut microbiota a formidable microenvironment for transfer of resistance genes within bacterial species.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1487
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalMicroorganisms
Volume8
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Carbapenemase
  • Enterobacteriaceae
  • ESBL
  • Gulls
  • Portugal

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