Guinea Bissau’s Rural Economy and Society: a reassessment of colonial and postcolonial dynamics

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Guinea-Bissau’s rural economy shows striking historical continuities from the peanut-based monoculture in colonial times to the ‘cashew revolution’ after independence. Despite periods of armed conflict and decolonization, and changing economic policies, the resilience of producers and communities formed the dynamic pillar of Guinea-Bissau's economy and society. The chapter focuses on ecological, socio-economic and historical trends that bridge colonial and post-independence periods, in order to analyse the organization of crop cultivation, markets, actors and politicies. The tensions between commercial farming and smallholder producers constitute an important thread, as well as the role of the state, trade networks and the feminization of the subsistence economy. The organization and performance of the country's rural economy is also addressed in the wider regional, West Arfican context by comparing it with its neighbours, i.e. Senegal and Guinea–Conakry.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationGuinea Bissau: from micro- state to ‘narco-state’
PublisherLondres: Hurst
Pages55
Number of pages79
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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