Fruit and Vegetable Consumption among Immigrants in Portugal: A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Study

L Costa, S Dias, MR Martins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study aims to compare adequate fruit and vegetable (F&V) intake between immigrants and natives in Portugal, and to analyse factors associated with consumption of F&V among immigrants. Data from a population based cross-sectional study (2014) was used. The final sample comprised 17,410 participants (≥20 years old), of whom 7.4% were immigrants. Chi-squared tests and logistic regression models were conducted to investigate the association between adequate F&V intake, sociodemographic, anthropometric, and lifestyle characteristics. Adequate F&V intake was more prevalent among immigrants (21.1% (95% CI: 19.0⁻23.4)) than natives (18.5% (95% CI: 17.9⁻19.1)), (p = 0.000). Association between migrant status and adequate F&V intake was only evident for men: immigrants were less likely to achieve an adequate F&V intake (OR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.66⁻0.68) when compared to Portuguese. Among immigrants, being female, older, with a higher education, and living in a low urbanisation area increased the odds of having F&V consumption closer to the recommendations. Adjusting for other factors, length of residence appears as a risk factor (15 or more years vs. 0⁻9 years: OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.50⁻0.53), (p = 0.000) for adequate F&V intake. Policies aiming to promote adequate F&V consumption should consider both populations groups, and gender-based strategies should address proper sociodemographic, anthropometric, and lifestyle determinants.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2299
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume15
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Oct 2018

Keywords

  • Portuguese
  • Fruit
  • Health
  • Immigrant
  • Vegetables

UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

  • SDG 3 - Good Health and Well-Being

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