Exploring the virulence potential of Staphylococcus aureus CC121 and CC152 lineages related to paediatric community-acquired bacteraemia in Manhiça, Mozambique

Marcelino Garrine, Mariana Andrade, Joana Neves, Inácio Mandomando, Isabel Couto, Sofia Santos Costa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent agent of bacteraemia. This bacterium has a variety of virulence traits that allow the establishment and maintenance of infection. This study explored the virulence profile of S. aureus strains causing paediatric bacteraemia (SAB) in Manhiça district, Mozambique. We analysed 336 S. aureus strains isolated from blood cultures of children younger than 5 years admitted to the Manhiça District Hospital between 2001 and 2019, previously characterized for antibiotic susceptibility and clonality. The strains virulence potential was evaluated by PCR detection of the Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) encoding genes, lukS-PV/lukF-PV, assessment of the capacity for biofilm formation and pathogenicity assays in Galleria mellonella. The overall carriage of PVL-encoding genes was over 40%, although reaching ~ 70 to 100% in the last years (2014 to 2019), potentially linked to the emergence of CC152 lineage. Strong biofilm production was a frequent trait of CC152 strains. Representative CC152 and CC121 strains showed higher virulence potential in the G. mellonella model when compared to reference strains, with variations within and between CCs. Our results highlight the importance of monitoring the emergent CC152-MSSA-PVL+ and other lineages, as they display important virulence traits that may negatively impact the management of SAB paediatric patients in Manhiça district, Mozambique.

Original languageEnglish
Article number10758
JournalScientific Reports
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2024

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