Evolution of resting energy expenditure, respiratory quotient, and adiposity in infants recovering from corrective surgery of major congenital gastrointestinal tract anomalies: A cohort study

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Abstract

This cohort study describes the evolution of resting energy expenditure (REE), respiratory quotient (RQ), and adiposity in infants recovering from corrective surgery of major congenital gastrointestinal tract anomalies. Energy and macronutrient intakes were assessed. The REE and RQ were assessed by indirect calorimetry, and fat mass index (FMI) was assessed by air displacement plethysmography. Longitudinal variations over time are described. Explanatory models for REE, RQ, and adiposity were obtained by multiple linear regression analysis. Twenty-nine infants were included, 15 born preterm and 14 at term, with median gestational age of 35.3 and 38.1 weeks and birth weight of 2304 g and 2935 g, respectively. In preterm infants, median REE varied between 55.7 and 67.4 Kcal/kg/d and median RQ increased from 0.70 to 0.86–0.92. In term infants, median REE varied between 57.3 and 67.9 Kcal/kg/d and median RQ increased from 0.63 to 0.84–0.88. Weight gain velocity was slower in term than preterm infants. FMI, assessed in a subset of 15 infants, varied between a median of 1.7 and 1.8 kg/m2 at term age. This low adiposity may be related to poor energy balance, low fat intakes, and low RQ¸ that were frequently recorded in several follow-up periods.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3093
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalNutrients
Volume12
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Adiposity
  • Congenital gastrointestinal anomalies
  • Fat mass index
  • Infants
  • Respiratory quotient
  • Resting energy expenditure

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