Employer-paid parking, mode choice, and suburbanization

Jan K. Brueckner, Sofia F. Franco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper constructs a theoretical model that facilitates analysis of the effects of employer-paid parking on mode choice, road investment and suburbanization. The model simplifies urban space by dividing it into two zones (islands), center and suburbs, which are connected by a congested road and a public-transit line. Each road commuter requires an allotment of CBD land for parking, and because the central zone's area is fixed, parking land reduces the amount available for central residences and CBD production. The model characterizes optimal resource allocation from the perspective of a social planner. The planning solution can be decentralized, which requires employee- rather than employer-paid parking, congestion tolls, and a tax (subsidy) to offset the road capacity deficit (surplus). The analysis then considers the effect of switching to employer-paid parking, with the burden of parking costs shifting from road users to employers, thus reducing the wage for all workers. This switch inefficiently increases road usage and capacity investment, while spurring an inefficient increase in suburbanization.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-46
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Urban Economics
Volume104
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2018

Fingerprint

suburbanization
parking
employer
road
road user
commuter
suburb
taxes
subsidy
congestion
resource allocation
wage
deficit
employee
Suburbanization
Roads
Mode choice
Employers
Parking
worker

Keywords

  • Cash-out
  • Employer-paid parking
  • Mode choice
  • Suburbanization

Cite this

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Employer-paid parking, mode choice, and suburbanization. / Brueckner, Jan K.; Franco, Sofia F.

In: Journal of Urban Economics, Vol. 104, 01.03.2018, p. 35-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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