47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Iron oxide nanoparticles are having been extensively investigated for several biomedical applicationssuch as hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging. However, one of the biggest problems of thesenanoparticles is their aggregation.Taking this into account, in this study the influence of three different surfactants (oleic acid, sodiumcitrate and Triton X-100) each one with various concentrations in the colloidal solutions stability wasanalyzed by using a rapid and facile method, the variation in the optical absorbance along time.The synthesized nanoparticles through chemical precipitation showed an average size of 9 nm and anarrow size distribution. X-ray diffraction pattern and Fourier Transform Infrared analysis confirmedthe presence of pure magnetite. SQUID measurements showed superparamagnetic properties with ablocking temperature around 155 K. In addition it was observed that neither sodium citrate nor TritonX-100 influences the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. On the other hand, oleic acid in a concen-tration of 64 mM decreases the saturation magnetization from 67 to 45 emu/g. Oleic acid exhibits a goodperformance as stabilizer of the iron oxide nanoparticles in an aqueous solution for 24 h, for concentra-tions that lead to the formation of the double layer.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)46-51
JournalJournal of Colloid and Interface Science
Volume419
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2014

Fingerprint

Colloids
Surface-Active Agents
Nanoparticles
Oleic Acid
Chemical Precipitation
Dromaiidae
Ferrosoferric Oxide
Octoxynol
Fourier Analysis
X-Ray Diffraction
Fever
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Temperature
ferric oxide

Keywords

  • Colloids
  • Iron oxide nanoparticles
  • Magnetic characterization
  • Magnetite
  • Oleic acid
  • Sodium citrate
  • Stability
  • Surfactants
  • Triton X-100
  • UV-VIS

Cite this

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title = "Effects of surfactants on the magnetic properties of iron oxide colloids",
abstract = "Iron oxide nanoparticles are having been extensively investigated for several biomedical applicationssuch as hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging. However, one of the biggest problems of thesenanoparticles is their aggregation.Taking this into account, in this study the influence of three different surfactants (oleic acid, sodiumcitrate and Triton X-100) each one with various concentrations in the colloidal solutions stability wasanalyzed by using a rapid and facile method, the variation in the optical absorbance along time.The synthesized nanoparticles through chemical precipitation showed an average size of 9 nm and anarrow size distribution. X-ray diffraction pattern and Fourier Transform Infrared analysis confirmedthe presence of pure magnetite. SQUID measurements showed superparamagnetic properties with ablocking temperature around 155 K. In addition it was observed that neither sodium citrate nor TritonX-100 influences the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. On the other hand, oleic acid in a concen-tration of 64 mM decreases the saturation magnetization from 67 to 45 emu/g. Oleic acid exhibits a goodperformance as stabilizer of the iron oxide nanoparticles in an aqueous solution for 24 h, for concentra-tions that lead to the formation of the double layer.",
keywords = "characterizationMagnetiteStabilityUV–VIS, ColloidsIron, nanoparticlesOleic, acidSodium, oxide, X-100SurfactantsMagnetic, citrateTriton, Colloids, Iron oxide nanoparticles, Magnetic characterization, Magnetite, Oleic acid, Sodium citrate, Stability, Surfactants, Triton X-100, UV-VIS",
author = "P Soares and Alves, {Ana M. R.} and Pereira, {Laura C J} and Coutinho, {Joana T.} and Ferreira, {Isabel Maria Merc{\^e}s} and Novo, {Carlos Manuel Mendes} and Borges, {Jo{\~a}o Paulo Miranda Ribeiro}",
note = "Sem PDF. Financial support for this work was provided by FCT-MEC through Strategic PEst-C/CTM/LA0025/2013-2014 project. P.I.P. Soares and J.T. Coutinho acknowledge FCT for PhD grants, SFRH/ BD/81711/2011 and SFRH/BD/84628/2012, respectively.",
year = "2014",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jcis.2013.12.045",
language = "English",
volume = "419",
pages = "46--51",
journal = "Journal of Colloid and Interface Science",
issn = "0021-9797",
publisher = "Elsevier",

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Effects of surfactants on the magnetic properties of iron oxide colloids. / Soares, P; Alves, Ana M. R.; Pereira, Laura C J; Coutinho, Joana T.; Ferreira, Isabel Maria Mercês; Novo, Carlos Manuel Mendes; Borges, João Paulo Miranda Ribeiro.

In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, Vol. 419, 01.04.2014, p. 46-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of surfactants on the magnetic properties of iron oxide colloids

AU - Soares, P

AU - Alves, Ana M. R.

AU - Pereira, Laura C J

AU - Coutinho, Joana T.

AU - Ferreira, Isabel Maria Mercês

AU - Novo, Carlos Manuel Mendes

AU - Borges, João Paulo Miranda Ribeiro

N1 - Sem PDF. Financial support for this work was provided by FCT-MEC through Strategic PEst-C/CTM/LA0025/2013-2014 project. P.I.P. Soares and J.T. Coutinho acknowledge FCT for PhD grants, SFRH/ BD/81711/2011 and SFRH/BD/84628/2012, respectively.

PY - 2014/4/1

Y1 - 2014/4/1

N2 - Iron oxide nanoparticles are having been extensively investigated for several biomedical applicationssuch as hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging. However, one of the biggest problems of thesenanoparticles is their aggregation.Taking this into account, in this study the influence of three different surfactants (oleic acid, sodiumcitrate and Triton X-100) each one with various concentrations in the colloidal solutions stability wasanalyzed by using a rapid and facile method, the variation in the optical absorbance along time.The synthesized nanoparticles through chemical precipitation showed an average size of 9 nm and anarrow size distribution. X-ray diffraction pattern and Fourier Transform Infrared analysis confirmedthe presence of pure magnetite. SQUID measurements showed superparamagnetic properties with ablocking temperature around 155 K. In addition it was observed that neither sodium citrate nor TritonX-100 influences the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. On the other hand, oleic acid in a concen-tration of 64 mM decreases the saturation magnetization from 67 to 45 emu/g. Oleic acid exhibits a goodperformance as stabilizer of the iron oxide nanoparticles in an aqueous solution for 24 h, for concentra-tions that lead to the formation of the double layer.

AB - Iron oxide nanoparticles are having been extensively investigated for several biomedical applicationssuch as hyperthermia and magnetic resonance imaging. However, one of the biggest problems of thesenanoparticles is their aggregation.Taking this into account, in this study the influence of three different surfactants (oleic acid, sodiumcitrate and Triton X-100) each one with various concentrations in the colloidal solutions stability wasanalyzed by using a rapid and facile method, the variation in the optical absorbance along time.The synthesized nanoparticles through chemical precipitation showed an average size of 9 nm and anarrow size distribution. X-ray diffraction pattern and Fourier Transform Infrared analysis confirmedthe presence of pure magnetite. SQUID measurements showed superparamagnetic properties with ablocking temperature around 155 K. In addition it was observed that neither sodium citrate nor TritonX-100 influences the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles. On the other hand, oleic acid in a concen-tration of 64 mM decreases the saturation magnetization from 67 to 45 emu/g. Oleic acid exhibits a goodperformance as stabilizer of the iron oxide nanoparticles in an aqueous solution for 24 h, for concentra-tions that lead to the formation of the double layer.

KW - characterizationMagnetiteStabilityUV–VIS

KW - ColloidsIron

KW - nanoparticlesOleic

KW - acidSodium

KW - oxide

KW - X-100SurfactantsMagnetic

KW - citrateTriton

KW - Colloids

KW - Iron oxide nanoparticles

KW - Magnetic characterization

KW - Magnetite

KW - Oleic acid

KW - Sodium citrate

KW - Stability

KW - Surfactants

KW - Triton X-100

KW - UV-VIS

U2 - 10.1016/j.jcis.2013.12.045

DO - 10.1016/j.jcis.2013.12.045

M3 - Article

VL - 419

SP - 46

EP - 51

JO - Journal of Colloid and Interface Science

JF - Journal of Colloid and Interface Science

SN - 0021-9797

ER -