Effects of acute bleeding followed by hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 or a crystalloid on propofol concentrations, cerebral oxygenation, and electroencephalographic and haemodynamic variables in pigs

A. Silva, C. Venâncio, A. P. Souza, Luísa Maria da Silva Pinto Ferreira, Paula Cristina de Sério Branco, P. G. de Pinho, P. Amorim, D. A. Ferreira

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bleeding changes the haemodynamics, compromising organ perfusion. In this study, the effects of bleeding followed by replacement with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES) or lactated Ringer's (LR) on cerebral oxygenation and electroencephalogram-derived parameters were investigated. Twelve young pigs under propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia were bled 30mL/kg and, after a 20-minute waiting period, volume replacement was performed with HES (GHES; N = 6) or LR (GRL; N = 6). Bleeding caused a decrease of more than 50% in mean arterial pressure (P < 0.01) and a decrease in cerebral oximetry (P = 0.039), bispectral index, and electroencephalogram total power (P = 0.04 and P < 0.01, resp.), while propofol plasma concentrations increased (P < 0.01). Both solutions restored the haemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation similarly and were accompanied by an increase in electroencephalogram total power. No differences between groups were found. However, one hour after the end of the volume replacement, the cardiac output (P = 0.03) and the cerebral oxygenation (P = 0.008) decreased in the GLR and were significantly lower than in GHES (P = 0.02). Volume replacement with HES 130/0.4 was capable of maintaining the cardiac output and cerebral oxygenation during a longer period than LR and caused a decrease in the propofol plasma concentrations.
Original languageEnglish
Article number710394
JournalVeterinary medicine international
Volume2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of acute bleeding followed by hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 or a crystalloid on propofol concentrations, cerebral oxygenation, and electroencephalographic and haemodynamic variables in pigs'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this