Early alveolar macrophage response and IL-1R-dependent T cell priming determine transmissibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains

Arianne Lovey, Sheetal Verma, Vaishnavi Kaipilyawar, Rodrigo Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Seema Husain, Moises Palaci, Reynaldo Dietze, Shuyi Ma, Robert D. Morrison, David R. Sherman, Jerrold J. Ellner, Padmini Salgame

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26 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Mechanisms underlying variability in transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains remain undefined. By characterizing high and low transmission strains of M.tuberculosis in mice, we show here that high transmission M.tuberculosis strain induce rapid IL-1R-dependent alveolar macrophage migration from the alveolar space into the interstitium and that this action is key to subsequent temporal events of early dissemination of bacteria to the lymph nodes, Th1 priming, granulomatous response and bacterial control. In contrast, IL-1R-dependent alveolar macrophage migration and early dissemination of bacteria to lymph nodes is significantly impeded in infection with low transmission M.tuberculosis strain; these events promote the development of Th17 immunity, fostering neutrophilic inflammation and increased bacterial replication. Our results suggest that by inducing granulomas with the potential to develop into cavitary lesions that aids bacterial escape into the airways, high transmission M.tuberculosis strain is poised for greater transmissibility. These findings implicate bacterial heterogeneity as an important modifier of TB disease manifestations and transmission.

Original languageEnglish
Article number884
JournalNature Communications
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2022

Keywords

  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  • transmission mechanisms
  • alveolar macrophages
  • imune response

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