The ion-exchange membrane bioreactor: developments and perspectives in drinking water treatment

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Until recently, membranes in bioreactors were essentially regarded as micro/ultra porous barriers to promote high cell concentrations for process intensification and to avoid contamination of the treated water with the biocatalyst. This chapter will discuss in particular the use of membrane bioreactors for treatment of water supplies contaminated with micro-polluting ions. The contamination of drinking water sources with inorganic compounds is a matter of concern, because of their harmful effect on human health. Some of these compounds are highly soluble in water and dissociate completely, resulting in ions that are chemically stable under normal water conditions. Examples of polluting ions include nitrate, nitrite, perchlorate, bromate, arsenate and ionic mercury, for which the proposed guideline values for drinking water quality are quite low (in the range of mu g/L to a few mg/L) owing to their carcinogenic effects or other risk factors to public health.
Original languageUnknown
Title of host publicationNATO Science for Peace and Security Series C-Environmental Security
Pages119-145
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011
EventNATO Advanced Training Course on Water Purification and Management in Mediterranean Countries -
Duration: 1 Jan 2009 → …

Conference

ConferenceNATO Advanced Training Course on Water Purification and Management in Mediterranean Countries
Period1/01/09 → …

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