Dimebon enhances hippocampus-dependent learning in both appetitive and inhibitory memory tasks in mice

Julie Vignisse, Harry W.M. Steinbusch, Alexei Bolkunov, Joao Nunes, Ana Isabel Santos, Christian Grandfils, Sergei Bachurin, Tatyana Strekalova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pre-clinical and clinical studies on dimebon (dimebolin or latrepirdine) have demonstrated its use as a cognitive enhancer. Here, we show that dimebon administered to 3-month-old C57BL6N mice 15. min prior to training in both appetitive and inhibitory learning tasks via repeated (0.1. mg/kg) and acute (0.5. mg/kg) i.p. injections, respectively, increases memory scores. Acute treatment with dimebon was found to enhance inhibitory learning, as also shown in the step-down avoidance paradigm in 7-month-old mice. Bolus administration of dimebon did not affect the animals' locomotion, exploration or anxiety-like behaviour, with the exception of exploratory behaviour in older mice in the novel cage test. In a model of appetitive learning, a spatial version of the Y-maze, dimebon increased the rate of correct choices and decreased the latency of accessing a water reward after water deprivation, and increased the duration of drinking behaviour during training/testing procedures. Repeated treatment with dimebon did not alter the behaviours in other tests or water consumption. Acute treatment of water-deprived and non-water-deprived mice with dimebon also did not affect their water intake. Our data suggest that dimebon enhances hippocampus-dependent learning in both appetitive and inhibitory tasks in mice.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)510-522
Number of pages13
JournalProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Mar 2011

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Dimebon
  • Hippocampus-dependent memory
  • Mouse

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