Dicholine succinate, the neuronal insulin sensitizer, normalizes behavior, REM sleep, hippocampal pGSK3 beta and niRNAs of NMDA receptor subunits in mouse models of depression

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Abstract

Central insulin receptor-mediated signaling is attracting the growing attention of researchers because of rapidly accumulating evidence implicating it in the mechanisms of plasticity, stress response, and neuropsychiatric disorders including depression. Dicholine succinate (DS), a mitochondrial complex II substrate, was shown to enhance insulin-receptor mediated signaling in neurons and is regarded as a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor. Compounds enhancing neuronal insulin receptor-mediated transmission exert an antidepressant-like effect in several pre-clinical paradigms of depression; similarly, such properties for DS were found with a stress-induced anhedonia model. Here, we additionally studied the effects of DS on several variables which were ameliorated by other insulin receptor sensitizers in mice. Pre-treatment with DS of chronically stressed C57BL6 mice rescued normal contextual fear conditioning, hippocampal gene expression of NMDA receptor subunit NR2A, the NR2A/NR2B ratio and increased REM sleep rebound after acute predation. In 18-month-old C57BL6 mice, a model of elderly depression, DS restored normal sucrose preference and activated the expression of neural plasticity factors in the hippocampus as shown by Illumina microarray. Finally, young naive DS-treated C57BL6 mice had reduced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and, similarly to imipramine-treated mice, preserved hippocampal levels of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GSK3 beta that was lowered by forced swimming in pharmacologically naive animals. Thus, DS can ameliorate behavioral and molecular outcomes under a variety of stress- and depression-related conditions. This further highlights neuronal insulin signaling as a new factor of pathogenesis and a potential pharmacotherapy of affective pathologies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)Online
JournalFrontiers In Behavioral Neuroscience
Volume9
Issue numberNA
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

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REM Sleep
Succinic Acid
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Insulin Receptor
Insulin
Depression
Anhedonia
Neuronal Plasticity
Imipramine
dicolin
Antidepressive Agents
Fear
Sucrose
Hippocampus
Anxiety
Research Personnel
Pathology
Gene Expression
Neurons
Drug Therapy

Cite this

@article{243931bc909e4f02a3be6869127092a5,
title = "Dicholine succinate, the neuronal insulin sensitizer, normalizes behavior, REM sleep, hippocampal pGSK3 beta and niRNAs of NMDA receptor subunits in mouse models of depression",
abstract = "Central insulin receptor-mediated signaling is attracting the growing attention of researchers because of rapidly accumulating evidence implicating it in the mechanisms of plasticity, stress response, and neuropsychiatric disorders including depression. Dicholine succinate (DS), a mitochondrial complex II substrate, was shown to enhance insulin-receptor mediated signaling in neurons and is regarded as a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor. Compounds enhancing neuronal insulin receptor-mediated transmission exert an antidepressant-like effect in several pre-clinical paradigms of depression; similarly, such properties for DS were found with a stress-induced anhedonia model. Here, we additionally studied the effects of DS on several variables which were ameliorated by other insulin receptor sensitizers in mice. Pre-treatment with DS of chronically stressed C57BL6 mice rescued normal contextual fear conditioning, hippocampal gene expression of NMDA receptor subunit NR2A, the NR2A/NR2B ratio and increased REM sleep rebound after acute predation. In 18-month-old C57BL6 mice, a model of elderly depression, DS restored normal sucrose preference and activated the expression of neural plasticity factors in the hippocampus as shown by Illumina microarray. Finally, young naive DS-treated C57BL6 mice had reduced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and, similarly to imipramine-treated mice, preserved hippocampal levels of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GSK3 beta that was lowered by forced swimming in pharmacologically naive animals. Thus, DS can ameliorate behavioral and molecular outcomes under a variety of stress- and depression-related conditions. This further highlights neuronal insulin signaling as a new factor of pathogenesis and a potential pharmacotherapy of affective pathologies.",
keywords = "GLYCOGEN-SYNTHASE KINASE-3, SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY, hippocampal plasticity, CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM, PREFRONTAL CORTEX, CHRONIC MILD STRESS, sleep EEG, FORCED SWIMMING TEST, MEMORY CONSOLIDATION, phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (pGSK-3beta), GENE-EXPRESSION, insulin receptor, dicholine succinate, chronic stress, IN-VIVO, NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B, aging, INDUCED ANHEDONIA",
author = "Santos, {Ana Isabel Lopes Francisco de Moura}",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00037",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "Online",
journal = "Frontiers In Behavioral Neuroscience",
issn = "1662-5153",
publisher = "Frontiers Media",
number = "NA",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dicholine succinate, the neuronal insulin sensitizer, normalizes behavior, REM sleep, hippocampal pGSK3 beta and niRNAs of NMDA receptor subunits in mouse models of depression

AU - Santos, Ana Isabel Lopes Francisco de Moura

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - Central insulin receptor-mediated signaling is attracting the growing attention of researchers because of rapidly accumulating evidence implicating it in the mechanisms of plasticity, stress response, and neuropsychiatric disorders including depression. Dicholine succinate (DS), a mitochondrial complex II substrate, was shown to enhance insulin-receptor mediated signaling in neurons and is regarded as a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor. Compounds enhancing neuronal insulin receptor-mediated transmission exert an antidepressant-like effect in several pre-clinical paradigms of depression; similarly, such properties for DS were found with a stress-induced anhedonia model. Here, we additionally studied the effects of DS on several variables which were ameliorated by other insulin receptor sensitizers in mice. Pre-treatment with DS of chronically stressed C57BL6 mice rescued normal contextual fear conditioning, hippocampal gene expression of NMDA receptor subunit NR2A, the NR2A/NR2B ratio and increased REM sleep rebound after acute predation. In 18-month-old C57BL6 mice, a model of elderly depression, DS restored normal sucrose preference and activated the expression of neural plasticity factors in the hippocampus as shown by Illumina microarray. Finally, young naive DS-treated C57BL6 mice had reduced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and, similarly to imipramine-treated mice, preserved hippocampal levels of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GSK3 beta that was lowered by forced swimming in pharmacologically naive animals. Thus, DS can ameliorate behavioral and molecular outcomes under a variety of stress- and depression-related conditions. This further highlights neuronal insulin signaling as a new factor of pathogenesis and a potential pharmacotherapy of affective pathologies.

AB - Central insulin receptor-mediated signaling is attracting the growing attention of researchers because of rapidly accumulating evidence implicating it in the mechanisms of plasticity, stress response, and neuropsychiatric disorders including depression. Dicholine succinate (DS), a mitochondrial complex II substrate, was shown to enhance insulin-receptor mediated signaling in neurons and is regarded as a sensitizer of the neuronal insulin receptor. Compounds enhancing neuronal insulin receptor-mediated transmission exert an antidepressant-like effect in several pre-clinical paradigms of depression; similarly, such properties for DS were found with a stress-induced anhedonia model. Here, we additionally studied the effects of DS on several variables which were ameliorated by other insulin receptor sensitizers in mice. Pre-treatment with DS of chronically stressed C57BL6 mice rescued normal contextual fear conditioning, hippocampal gene expression of NMDA receptor subunit NR2A, the NR2A/NR2B ratio and increased REM sleep rebound after acute predation. In 18-month-old C57BL6 mice, a model of elderly depression, DS restored normal sucrose preference and activated the expression of neural plasticity factors in the hippocampus as shown by Illumina microarray. Finally, young naive DS-treated C57BL6 mice had reduced depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors and, similarly to imipramine-treated mice, preserved hippocampal levels of the phosphorylated (inactive) form of GSK3 beta that was lowered by forced swimming in pharmacologically naive animals. Thus, DS can ameliorate behavioral and molecular outcomes under a variety of stress- and depression-related conditions. This further highlights neuronal insulin signaling as a new factor of pathogenesis and a potential pharmacotherapy of affective pathologies.

KW - GLYCOGEN-SYNTHASE KINASE-3

KW - SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY

KW - hippocampal plasticity

KW - CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM

KW - PREFRONTAL CORTEX

KW - CHRONIC MILD STRESS

KW - sleep EEG

KW - FORCED SWIMMING TEST

KW - MEMORY CONSOLIDATION

KW - phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (pGSK-3beta)

KW - GENE-EXPRESSION

KW - insulin receptor

KW - dicholine succinate

KW - chronic stress

KW - IN-VIVO

KW - NMDA receptor subunits NR2A and NR2B

KW - aging

KW - INDUCED ANHEDONIA

U2 - 10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00037

DO - 10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00037

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - Online

JO - Frontiers In Behavioral Neuroscience

JF - Frontiers In Behavioral Neuroscience

SN - 1662-5153

IS - NA

ER -