Design and experimental testing of an adaptive shape-morphing tensegrity structure, with frequency self-tuning capabilities, using shape-memory alloys

Filipe Amarante Dos Santos, André Rodrigues, Andrea Micheletti

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present paper explores the capabilities of a tensegrity-inspired tower with regard to frequency tuning by shape morphing. To change the configuration of the proposed structure, shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuators are used. This actuation principle also takes advantage of the variation of the elastic modulus of SMAs associated with the martensitic transformation. The temperature modulation of the SMA wires is successfully achieved by Joule heating, through a proportional-integral-derivative controller, to change between a low-temperature shape and a high-temperature shape. The implementation of a short-time-Fourier-transform control algorithm allows for the correct identification of the dominant input frequency, associated with the dynamic excitation. This information is used to automatically change the configuration of the structure in order to shift its natural frequency away from that of the dynamic excitation. With this frequency tuning, one obtains a reduction of the accelerations throughout the structure up to about 80%. The good performance of the proposed control approach gives promising indications regarding the use of tensegrity systems, in combination with SMAs, for shape-morphing applications, and, in particular, for self-tuning structures.

Original languageEnglish
Article number105008
JournalSmart Materials & Structures
Volume24
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • adaptive vibration control
  • frequency tuning
  • shape-memory alloys
  • shape-morphing
  • tensegrity structures

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Design and experimental testing of an adaptive shape-morphing tensegrity structure, with frequency self-tuning capabilities, using shape-memory alloys'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this