Characterization and biotechnological potential of extracellular polysaccharides synthesized by alteromonas strains isolated from french polynesia marine environments

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Abstract

Marine environments comprise almost three quarters of Earth’s surface, representing the largest ecosystem of our planet. The vast ecological and metabolic diversity found in marine microorganisms suggest that these marine resources have a huge potential as sources of novel commercially appealing biomolecules, such as exopolysaccharides (EPS). Six Alteromonas strains from different marine environments in French Polynesia atolls were selected for EPS extraction. All the EPS were heteropolysaccharides composed of different monomers, including neutral monosaccharides (glucose, galactose, and mannose, rhamnose and fucose), and uronic acids (glucuronic acid and galacturonic acid), which accounted for up to 45.5 mol% of the EPS compositions. Non-carbohydrate substituents, such as acetyl (0.5–2.1 wt%), pyruvyl (0.2–4.9 wt%), succinyl (1–1.8 wt%), and sulfate (1.98–3.43 wt%); and few peptides (1.72–6.77 wt%) were also detected. Thermal analysis demonstrated that the EPS had a degradation temperature above 260 C, and high char yields (32–53%). Studies on EPS functional properties revealed that they produce viscous aqueous solutions with a shear thinning behavior and could form strong gels in two distinct ways: by the addition of Fe2+, or in the presence of Mg2+, Cu2+, or Ca2+ under alkaline conditions. Thus, these EPS could be versatile materials for different applications.

Original languageEnglish
Article number522
JournalMarine Drugs
Volume19
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Alteromonas sp
  • Exopolysaccharide characterization
  • Functional properties
  • Gelation
  • Rheology

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