Change in the prevalence and social patterning of first-and second-hand smoking in Portugal: a repeated cross-sectional study (2005 and 2014)

Joana Alves, Rita Filipe, João Machado, Baltazar Nunes, Julian Perelman

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Abstract

Between 2005 and 2007, important reinforcements of the tobacco legislation have been implemented in Portugal, which may have affected smoking patterns. The aim of this study was to measure the change in prevalence of first-and second-hand smoking (SHS) among adults, and its socio-demographic patterning in Portugal from 2005 to 2014. Data from the last two Portuguese National Health Interview Surveys (2005 and 2014) were used. The changes in daily smoking and SHS were measured using Poisson regressions, stratifying by sex and survey year. The inequalities were measured using relative inequality indexes (RII). From 2005 to 2014, there was a reduction in SHS (75%–54% among men, and 52%–38% among women), and a reduction in smoking among men (27%–26%), and an increase among women (9%–12%). SHS reduction was more marked among less privileged people. Among Portuguese men, inequalities in daily smoking have increased slightly, while among women the gap favoring low-educated reduced. Between 2005 and 2014, SHS decreased, but not daily smoking, particularly among women. Additionally, socioeconomic inequalities in smoking increased. Future policies should simultaneously tackle smoking and SHS prevalence, and their socioeconomic patterning. More comprehensive policies such as comprehensive national (non-partial) bans, combined with price increases could be more effective.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3594
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume17
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 May 2020

Keywords

  • Portugal
  • Second-hand smoking
  • Smoking
  • Socioeconomic inequalities

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