Catalytic carbon formation

clarifying the alternative kinetic routes and defining a kinetic linearity for sustained growth concept

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding stable carbon formation mechanisms requires isothermal kinetic studies. Distinguishing preliminary solid-state changes from the prevailing steady-state (sustained) carbon formation route is essential. The three alternative kinetic routes for carbon formation are clarified: dual catalyst route, gas phase pyrolysis and hybrid route—a combination of the two previous ones. When kinetic linearity is observed in a reaction involving catalytic formation or gasification of a solid, this is evidence that only a steady-state carbon diffusion process is operating obeying Fick’s 1st law in a stable geometry. Fick’s 2nd law rules in the initial transition stage, involving nucleation and solid-state reaction processes. Catalyst duality is discussed, considering the roles played by the two distinct surface regions between which the bulk carbon flux is maintained during steady-state reaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)393-414
Number of pages22
JournalReaction Kinetics, Mechanisms And Catalysis
Volume118
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016

Fingerprint

linearity
Carbon
routes
Kinetics
carbon
kinetics
solid state
catalysts
Catalysts
gasification
Solid state reactions
Gasification
pyrolysis
Pyrolysis
Nucleation
Gases
nucleation
vapor phases
Fluxes
Geometry

Keywords

  • Carbon formation routes
  • Catalyst duality
  • Kinetic linearity
  • Kinetics vs mechanism
  • Nucleation inhibition

Cite this

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title = "Catalytic carbon formation: clarifying the alternative kinetic routes and defining a kinetic linearity for sustained growth concept",
abstract = "Understanding stable carbon formation mechanisms requires isothermal kinetic studies. Distinguishing preliminary solid-state changes from the prevailing steady-state (sustained) carbon formation route is essential. The three alternative kinetic routes for carbon formation are clarified: dual catalyst route, gas phase pyrolysis and hybrid route—a combination of the two previous ones. When kinetic linearity is observed in a reaction involving catalytic formation or gasification of a solid, this is evidence that only a steady-state carbon diffusion process is operating obeying Fick’s 1st law in a stable geometry. Fick’s 2nd law rules in the initial transition stage, involving nucleation and solid-state reaction processes. Catalyst duality is discussed, considering the roles played by the two distinct surface regions between which the bulk carbon flux is maintained during steady-state reaction.",
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author = "Lobo, {Luis Sousa}",
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T1 - Catalytic carbon formation

T2 - clarifying the alternative kinetic routes and defining a kinetic linearity for sustained growth concept

AU - Lobo, Luis Sousa

PY - 2016/8/1

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N2 - Understanding stable carbon formation mechanisms requires isothermal kinetic studies. Distinguishing preliminary solid-state changes from the prevailing steady-state (sustained) carbon formation route is essential. The three alternative kinetic routes for carbon formation are clarified: dual catalyst route, gas phase pyrolysis and hybrid route—a combination of the two previous ones. When kinetic linearity is observed in a reaction involving catalytic formation or gasification of a solid, this is evidence that only a steady-state carbon diffusion process is operating obeying Fick’s 1st law in a stable geometry. Fick’s 2nd law rules in the initial transition stage, involving nucleation and solid-state reaction processes. Catalyst duality is discussed, considering the roles played by the two distinct surface regions between which the bulk carbon flux is maintained during steady-state reaction.

AB - Understanding stable carbon formation mechanisms requires isothermal kinetic studies. Distinguishing preliminary solid-state changes from the prevailing steady-state (sustained) carbon formation route is essential. The three alternative kinetic routes for carbon formation are clarified: dual catalyst route, gas phase pyrolysis and hybrid route—a combination of the two previous ones. When kinetic linearity is observed in a reaction involving catalytic formation or gasification of a solid, this is evidence that only a steady-state carbon diffusion process is operating obeying Fick’s 1st law in a stable geometry. Fick’s 2nd law rules in the initial transition stage, involving nucleation and solid-state reaction processes. Catalyst duality is discussed, considering the roles played by the two distinct surface regions between which the bulk carbon flux is maintained during steady-state reaction.

KW - Carbon formation routes

KW - Catalyst duality

KW - Kinetic linearity

KW - Kinetics vs mechanism

KW - Nucleation inhibition

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DO - 10.1007/s11144-016-0993-x

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JO - Reaction Kinetics, Mechanisms And Catalysis

JF - Reaction Kinetics, Mechanisms And Catalysis

SN - 1878-5190

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