Calle horno del vidrio: preliminary study of glass production remains found in granada, spain, dated to the 16th and 17th centuries

Inês Coutinho, Isabel Cambil Campaña, Luís Cerqueira Alves, Teresa Medici

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Abstract

A set of 14 glass fragments and production remains dated to the 16th and 17th centuries was collected during rescue archaeological works conducted in Granada, Spain, and was characterised by µ-PIXE. This preliminary study constitutes the first analytical approach to glass manufacturing remains from a Spanish production dated to the early-modern period. µ-PIXE allowed for the quantification of major, minor and some trace elements of the glass fragments. It also allowed mapping the elemental distribution on the fragments that were identified as an interface of crucible/glass. This analysis constitutes an evaluation of the ionic exchange between glass and crucible. The glass colours vary from the natural green and blue hues to completely colourless samples. The results show that the majority of the glass samples are of soda-lime-silicate composition, and only one proved to be of a potassium-rich composition. From this, one can hypothesise that glass rich in sodium (following the Mediterranean tradition) and potassium-rich glass (following a central and north European tradition) were both locally produced. Since this location was known as la Calle Horno del Vidrio (Glass Furnace Street) and several production evidences were found, it is highly probable that an artisanal glass production existed in this area.

Original languageEnglish
Article number688
Number of pages20
JournalMinerals
Volume11
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2021

Keywords

  • 16th Century
  • Glass kiln
  • Glass production
  • Objects
  • Production remains
  • Spain
  • µPIXE

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