Behavioral strategy in the wild

Wayne Borchardt, Takhaui Kamzabek, Dan Lovallo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Purpose
A decade after Powell et al.’s (2011) seminal article on behavioral strategy, which called for models to solve real-world problems, the authors revisit the field to ask whether behavioral strategy is coming of age. The purpose of this paper is to explain how behavioral strategy can and has been used in real-world settings.

Design/methodology/approach
This study presents a conceptual review with case study examples of the impact of behavioral strategy on real-world problems.

Findings
This study illustrates several examples where behavioral strategy debiasing has been effective. Although no causal claims can be made, with the stark contrast between the negative impact of biased strategies and the positive results emerging from debiasing techniques, this study argues that there is evidence of the benefits of a behavioral strategy mindset, and that this should be the mindset of a responsible strategic leader.

Practical implications
This study presents a demonstration of analytical, debate and organizational debiasing techniques and how they are being used in real-world settings, specifically military intelligence, Mergers and acquisitions deal-making, resource allocation and capital projects.

Social implications
Behavioral strategy has broad application in private and public sectors. It has proven practical value in various settings, for example, the application of reference class forecasting in large infrastructure projects.

Originality/value
A conceptual review of behavioral strategy in the wild.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1185-1204
JournalManagement Research Review
Volume45
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Aug 2022

Keywords

  • Strategicmanagement
  • Cognitive bias
  • Behavioral bias
  • Behavioral strategy
  • Couteraction
  • Countermeasure
  • Debias

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